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Old 08-11-2018, 03:44 PM   #1
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Default Electric heat sources????

I’m wondering what electric heat source is best, easy, cost effective, cheapest etc... I just bought a house built in 1976, and have half the basement torn apart for remodeling. I’m at a stand still for what electric heat source to use. I have a 240 wall heater in the family room 12’x20’ and that’s all (besides a fireplace). The soon to be master bedroom that I’m working on adjacent to the family room has nothing. I’m all but ready to sheetrock with the exception of a heat source. I have a mini split AC with a heat pump in storage that I could put in - I don’t know if I need the AC there though as it is cool enough in the summer time, and I’d like to use it upstairs in the open living, dining, kitchen area. I thought about more wall heaters but I don’t know much about quality cost effective brands. I abhor baseboard heaters. Is there anything out there I’m missing? If not what brand wall heaters are good? Any thoughts or tips would be appreciated.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:00 PM   #2
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Not a DIY site. Sorry. Go to the mall.

Sorry, I see you're an apprentice.

Go to any of the electric space heating manufacturer's websites and they should have an easy heat loss calculator. I have even seen the inexpensive recessed fan forced heaters used in bathrooms used for supplemental heat. The good ones come with a fintube element. I can't imagine you need a lot of heat in Texas.

Last edited by 99cents; 08-11-2018 at 04:16 PM.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:05 PM   #3
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Being a basement, for the most comfort I would use floor heat.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:06 PM   #4
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I’m not a DIY, I’m an industrial I&E tech and a first year electrical apprentice. I’m looking for guidance on my own house, and hoping to learn more from others experience.
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:18 PM   #5
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I didn’t think that was possible until just now doing some quick research. I have only seen hydronic radiant floor heating before. Thanks!
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:22 PM   #6
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Temperature is relative... but no in TX i most likely wouldn’t have needed it. I did move back home to Idaho though and it is definitely a necessity. Thanks!
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sblk55 View Post
Being a basement, for the most comfort I would use floor heat.
In electric? How?
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Old 08-11-2018, 04:34 PM   #8
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On a basement floor, Warmtiles recommends 15 Watts per square feet just to keep the floor warm. If there is an electric floor heating product made for space heating, I would like to hear about it. I would just keep it simple and use space heaters. For one thing, if your floor heating burns out, it's a big job to repair/replace.
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Old 08-12-2018, 02:49 AM   #9
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I would go with the split heat pump you already have.
Not sure how cold it gets where you are?
Heat pumps in temperate climates do a great job. Not so much in very cold climates.
Less energy as well.
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Old 08-12-2018, 03:00 AM   #10
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I vote for the heat pump. It will heat and cool. Next year/season won't necessarily be the same as this year.

Buddy up with an A/C guy to teach you about how to run your duct work and make sure you get good supply & return from important areas like MBR. Optimally the areas you spend the most time in will have the greatest cooling & heating so you're not wasting money in other areas of the house to be comfortable where you spend your time.
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Old 08-12-2018, 07:42 AM   #11
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If you hate baseboards, you could look into the radiant infrared cove heaters. You should be able to hedge and wire so that you can convert to baseboards if you hate the infrared cove heaters or vice versa.

A split system AC / heat pump with baseboard heat can be a great combination IMO.
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:34 AM   #12
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I'm not sure what your building code is down there but up here in the frozen north, we are miltant about insulation and infiltration. A typical stud basement perimeter wall is 2 X 6 with a gap between the stud wall and the concrete wall. We normally use a vapour boot on device boxes and openings are sealed with acoustical sealant. The joist cavities above the stud walls are spray foamed.

You won't have any heat loss through the ceiling because it's heated above. If your basement perimeter walls are tight and well insulated, you might be surprised at how little heat is required. If you reduce drafts it goes a long ways for comfort. I tend to oversize heaters and use built in stats as zone control. You can also use a wall mount electronic stat and it will have less temperature swing than bimetal.

70's houses here are usually drafty and they used really thin vapour barrier. If you have the walls open, that's the time to upgrade.
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