Ideas to hang a 500lb Chandelier? - Page 2 - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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Old 03-22-2010, 10:50 PM   #21
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How big is the chandelier?

Figure out the square footage, then hire some Craigslist wannabe who advertises resi work for $2/ft². Slip him a 20-spot and tell him to keep the change, just have it done by lunch.
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Old 03-23-2010, 12:02 AM   #22
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I've always relied on iron workers or millwrights for the heavy stuff. Let the structural pros take the liability.
Could not have said it better, there is a reason 4 other people turned it down.
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Old 03-23-2010, 12:59 AM   #23
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she called 4 different people already and nobody wants to get involved
I can see why

Hope you make much $$$ for doing this one.

Good luck.
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:25 AM   #24
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If you have called 4 people, and no one wants to do it... That should get you thinking...
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Old 03-23-2010, 03:03 AM   #25
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I agreee with Drsparky Let someone Who knows about structure do the xtra bracing and support, it,s your job and her life on the line
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Old 03-23-2010, 03:27 AM   #26
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That threaded piece is supposed to go into a hickey or box mount. Also called a crows foot. But I would also be inclined to use an Aladdin lift. Those guys know how to hang a heave fixture. Even though you say it will run into the stairs, they have stops you set. They also move very slow. All the ones I have put in where to make cleaning possible. So it would, even stopping at the stair level make that possible. They are surprisingly cheap considering. And they do make them rated for the load.
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Old 03-23-2010, 07:10 AM   #27
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I would install the lift. I just think its is the right way to go. Its rated for that kind of weight.
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:51 PM   #28
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It would be irresponsible to hang a fixture that heavy without a structural engineer being involved. A 500# point load is much different than a distributed load. Anyone who tells you "just to hang it" has no concept of the tremendous liability this job has. If this thing falls, it WILL kill someone standing near it. If beefing up the structure really is as simple as sistering some joists, then a structural engineer sign-off will be easy.
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Old 03-23-2010, 08:19 PM   #29
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500 pounds....seriously?

I doubt it weighs that much. A 500 pound chandelier would be massive.

1. Check the framing.
2. Spread the load over as many rafters/joists as you can.
3. Use BIG hardware.

You mentioned lag bolts but I wasn't clear on the application. Obviously, never use lags to support anything this big. You want to thru bolt whatever hardware you use.
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Old 03-23-2010, 08:42 PM   #30
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The ceiling has enough support i could hang a car off it, im not worried about the ceiling coming down. Im more concerned about the fact that i can only use a piece of 1/8" all thread... thats all the light fixture will accept.

Its got about a 8-9' span when fully assembled. Its all brass. The main fixture is about 180 lbs with (12) 3' long arms that weigh 25lbs each.

The steel im going to use will span across 5 beams, but im going to frame it so it is supported by the walls instead of the rafters. I will post some pics of my framing job and the light when i get it all up.
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:44 PM   #31
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500 pounds....seriously?

I doubt it weighs that much. A 500 pound chandelier would be massive.

1. Check the framing.
2. Spread the load over as many rafters/joists as you can.
3. Use BIG hardware.

You mentioned lag bolts but I wasn't clear on the application. Obviously, never use lags to support anything this big. You want to thru bolt whatever hardware you use.
Dont mess with the 3/8 stuff. Go right to half inch. I would do the same as the above
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:31 PM   #32
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Although this is my first post it anit my first rodeo. You need to get an engineer to design the how to on this for liability reasons. Oh yeah, they anit cheap. 500 lbs? Thats more than a piano.
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:33 PM   #33
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Although this is my first post it anit my first rodeo. You need to get an engineer to design the how to on this for liability reasons. Oh yeah, they anit cheap. 500 lbs? Thats more than a piano.
It's just labor, and doable...ANIT?
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:39 PM   #34
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It's just labor, and doable...ANIT?

He ain't spellin' ain't right.
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:40 PM   #35
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He ain't spellin' ain't right.
Ya think?
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:53 PM   #36
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Although this is my first post it anit my first rodeo.

It is your 2nd post.
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:56 PM   #37
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I am an electrian not an english major. Now its my 3rd post and the previous post still indicates first post. By the way thanks for the "warm" welcome.
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:57 PM   #38
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i am an electrian not an english major. Now its my 3rd post and the previous post still indicates first post. By the way thanks for the "warm" welcome.
cool
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:03 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ms12987 View Post
.... Im more concerned about the fact that i can only use a piece of 1/8" all thread... thats all the light fixture will accept.

Its got about a 8-9' span when fully assembled. Its all brass. The main fixture is about 180 lbs with (12) 3' long arms that weigh 25lbs each.

The steel im going to use will span across 5 beams, but im going to frame it so it is supported by the walls instead of the rafters. I will post some pics of my framing job and the light when i get it all up.
That pipe is actually 3/8" x 27 threads per inch. Commonly called 1/8 NPT.

For larger fixtures, I would recommend using at least ¼" NPT or ½"x16 threads per inch pipe.
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Old 03-23-2010, 11:20 PM   #40
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Sorta like hanging a ceiling fan from 2 8-32s on a octagon box.
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