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Old 05-03-2012, 07:41 PM   #1
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Default Hello everyone, Im licensed from Massachusetts

Wow, I wish i found this forum earlier in my career. Im from the Boston area and have been doing electrical work for the past 8 years. Mostly in commercial space in the city. Right now im trying to start my own jobs up..small residential stuff for now an area where i have the least experience. Hope I can be of help to some and also hope I can gt some great advice in return...


Cheers,

Dave
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Old 05-03-2012, 07:49 PM   #2
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Welcome!
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Old 05-03-2012, 07:51 PM   #3
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Oh great, another Mass hole.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:02 PM   #4
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Wow, I wish i found this forum earlier in my career. Im from the Boston area and have been doing electrical work for the past 8 years. Mostly in commercial space in the city. Right now im trying to start my own jobs up..small residential stuff for now an area where i have the least experience. Hope I can be of help to some and also hope I can gt some great advice in return...


Cheers,

Dave
Dave If you have very little experience in residential Electrical work then you need to work with a company that specializes in residential electrical work first so when you go price a job you will be confident in what the scope is and how to do the job right the first time, it is a whole different animal than commercial work.

Keep in mind that you have to pull permits for all the work you are doing unless it is just changing light bulbs.


Welcome to the forum..
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:16 PM   #5
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Dave If you have very little experience in residential Electrical work then you need to work with a company that specializes in residential electrical work first so when you go price a job you will be confident in what the scope is and how to do the job right the first time, it is a whole different animal than commercial work.

Keep in mind that you have to pull permits for all the work you are doing unless it is just changing light bulbs.


Welcome to the forum..
thank you

yes i have worked for a residential company for about 5 months and did a few small jobs and such on my own but I still need experience on pricing jobs and getting work, building clients etc...All in all I probably have about 9 month xp in res work but I have never bid on my own job yet...All the small jobs i got were family/friends. I feel comfortable in the scope of work but still have loads to learn in the business end. Such as being able to find leads, make the right bids and getting the work. Id rather branch off on my own at this point in my life even if it means eating some crud and learning the hard way.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:48 PM   #6
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thank you

yes i have worked for a residential company for about 5 months and did a few small jobs and such on my own but I still need experience on pricing jobs and getting work, building clients etc...All in all I probably have about 9 month xp in res work but I have never bid on my own job yet...All the small jobs i got were family/friends. I feel comfortable in the scope of work but still have loads to learn in the business end. Such as being able to find leads, make the right bids and getting the work. Id rather branch off on my own at this point in my life even if it means eating some crud and learning the hard way.
Cool on pricing jobs the best way in my opinion is to use a flat rate pricing system.

And what I mean is a system where you can price a job and quote a grand total price "ONLY" ,,,You want to steer clear of hourly rate pricing otherwise you will be stuck making a low hourly rate and bankrupt your self fast.

There many threads about flat rate pricing read them all and you will get a good start on learning how to price jobs.

There are many members here that use some form of a flat rate pricing system.

almost all customers want to know what the "grand total" a job will cost them.

If you show them your hourly rates after you have done the proper calculations on what your total business costs are per year divided by 1,000 man hours they will think you are ripping them off so don't show them.

Make a stock list and mark up that stock so it covers your costs of getting the stock and pays you for the time as well.

You also have to figure out how long a project will take so you need to time each task put that in your notes so you can look later and you will have an average number of hours too look up so you can pinpoint the average amount of time you get the work done.

Then take the grand total stock and the grand total of hours add up the numbers in to one grand total.,Now you have that price you will give the customer.

If you close on every bid that you give then your prices are way too low.

Read some of the threads on this part of the forum..http://www.electriciantalk.com/f15/

You will find a lot of info that will help you learn the best way to price a job.

And you can always start your own thread on the subject.
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Last edited by HARRY304E; 05-03-2012 at 08:51 PM.
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:50 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by HARRY304E View Post
Cool on pricing jobs the best way in my opinion is to use a flat rate pricing system.

And what i mean is a system where you can price a job and quote a grand total price "ONLY" ,,,You want to steer clear of hourly rate pricing otherwise you will be stuck making a low hourly rate and bankrupt your self fast.

There mant threads about flat rate pricing read them all and you will get a good start on learning how to price jobs.

There many members here that use some form of a flate rate pricing system.

Allmost all customers want to know what the "grand total" a job is going to cost them.

If you show them your hourly rates after you have done the proper calculations on what your total business costs are per year devided by 1,000 man hours they will think you are ripping them off so don't show them.

Make a stock list and mark up that stock so it civers your costs of getting the stock and pays you for the time as well.

You also have to figure out how long a project will take so you need to tme each task put that in your notes so you can look later and you will have an average number of hours too look up so you can pinpoint the avaerage amout of time you get the work done.

Then take the grand total stock and the grand total of hours add up the numbers in to one grand total.,Now you have that price you will give the customer.

If you close on every bid that you give then your prices are way too low.

Read some of the threads on this part of the forum..http://www.electriciantalk.com/f15/

You will find a lot of info that will help you learn the best way to price a job.

And you can always start your own thread on the subject.
awesome advice, thank you.
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:15 AM   #8
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awesome advice, thank you.
Any time..

Read all those Business and pricing threads that will really help you out in getting started.

Good luck...
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:25 AM   #9
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Welcome to the forum.. I hope you don't talk funny..
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:26 AM   #10
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Welcome to the forum.. I hope you don't talk funny..
no but i have a cousin vinny, he talks funny
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:27 AM   #11
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no but i have a cousin vinny, he talks funny
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Old 05-06-2012, 02:49 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by HARRY304E View Post
Cool on pricing jobs the best way in my opinion is to use a flat rate pricing system.

And what I mean is a system where you can price a job and quote a grand total price "ONLY" ,,,You want to steer clear of hourly rate pricing otherwise you will be stuck making a low hourly rate and bankrupt your self fast.

There many threads about flat rate pricing read them all and you will get a good start on learning how to price jobs.

There are many members here that use some form of a flat rate pricing system.

almost all customers want to know what the "grand total" a job will cost them.

If you show them your hourly rates after you have done the proper calculations on what your total business costs are per year divided by 1,000 man hours they will think you are ripping them off so don't show them.

Make a stock list and mark up that stock so it covers your costs of getting the stock and pays you for the time as well.

You also have to figure out how long a project will take so you need to time each task put that in your notes so you can look later and you will have an average number of hours too look up so you can pinpoint the average amount of time you get the work done.

Then take the grand total stock and the grand total of hours add up the numbers in to one grand total.,Now you have that price you will give the customer.

If you close on every bid that you give then your prices are way too low.

Read some of the threads on this part of the forum..http://www.electriciantalk.com/f15/

You will find a lot of info that will help you learn the best way to price a job.

And you can always start your own thread on the subject.
Thanks for the info man....... I recently started a shop in CO, and have been looking into flat rate pricing
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Old 05-06-2012, 03:17 AM   #13
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Thanks for the info man....... I recently started a shop in CO, and have been looking into flat rate pricing
I wish you good luck with your new business...
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Old 05-06-2012, 03:29 AM   #14
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Welcome to the forum.. I hope you don't talk funny..

Yoo, taulk funny. and make lousy clam chowdah.
Who in their right mind puts tamatuh juice in chowdah!!!?
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Old 05-06-2012, 03:46 AM   #15
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Yoo, taulk funny. and make lousy clam chowdah.
Who in their right mind puts tamatuh juice in chowdah!!!?
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Old 05-06-2012, 09:52 AM   #16
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Yoo, taulk funny. and make lousy clam chowdah.
Who in their right mind puts tamatuh juice in chowdah!!!?

If you can do this you can do that.

http://www.boozingear.com/blog/2008/...ve-nationwide/
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