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Old 04-08-2020, 06:46 PM   #1
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Default Driling Through Studs

Looking for anyones input on the best way to drill through these steel studs. Drilling horizontally, parallel to the bottom of the window. I am thinking a carbide cutter and right angle drill would work. Looking to see if there is a better way out there. The steel is thick, probably at least 1/16"
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Old 04-08-2020, 06:49 PM   #2
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Stud punch if you have the room.

Carbide cutters work very well, just gotta keep em lubed up like everything else.

How many studs and holes? Like a ton of them or just a few?
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Old 04-08-2020, 07:02 PM   #3
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I just use a step bit.
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Old 04-09-2020, 06:06 AM   #4
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No room for a stud punch. I like the step bit idea. About 20-30 holes.
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Old 04-09-2020, 06:46 AM   #5
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Buy a couple of these

Milwaukee 1-3/8 in. SHOCKWAVE IMPACT DUTY Hole Saw



https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwauke...9830/204994423

And 50 of these

Arlington SB13



http://www.aifittings.com/catalog/lo...tal-studs/SB13

and you'll be done faster than what it took me to make this post.
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Old 04-13-2020, 01:37 PM   #6
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I usually use a stud punch where I can. If there's no room, I use a step bit on my impact for the lighter gauge stuff and a hole saw on a drill for the heavy gauge. Keep them lubed up or you'll be replacing them often (especially with the heavier gauge studs). I've also found the Milwaukee Quik-lok hole saw extensions come in handy for situations you have 2 studs close together. Its also come in handy for several other situations and fits my holehawg and auger for residential rough ins.

PS i'd refrain from using any high torque drills on metal studs. If it catches, youll rip studs out of the wall lol.
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Old 04-13-2020, 02:12 PM   #7
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Greenlee Stud Punch
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Old 04-13-2020, 02:20 PM   #8
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Oxygen and Acetylene.
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 99cents View Post
I just use a step bit.

Yep


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Old 04-15-2020, 06:28 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 99cents View Post
I just use a step bit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by terras View Post
Yep
It's fine if you're just making a few holes but a step bit isn't really the right tool for the job, I bet I can talk you out of it.

Step bits are slow for making holes, because you are actually making a series of holes - one for each step.

Compared to a cutter, you make a lot more shavings mess with a step bit. Think about it, the whole slug you make with a cutter - that's all shavings with a step bit.

Unless you're making a hole the max size of the step bit, you have to carefully stop at the right step to get the right size hole. If you don't get the right size, your bushing won't fit.

Step bits are expensive and one of the most pilfered things on the job site.

It's hard to find step bits with a hex shank that will work with an impact driver. The Milwaukee cutters are at HD and etc., and on the M18 impact make a nice short package that's easy to fit between studs and easy to put an extension on.

A step bit still is a must to have around, it's by far the easiest way to enlarge an existing KO, and you can drill a bunch of different size holes with one bit, and I will admit I just get a kick out of watching them work, but then I am easily entertained.
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Last edited by splatz; 04-15-2020 at 06:43 AM.
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Old 04-15-2020, 09:03 AM   #11
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@splatz - I agree with your assessment, by the OP is only doing 30 holes. Now if he was doing several hundred or a thousand, then the stud punch is probably the best option; granted it cannot get to all the places you need, but then you are back to drilling just a few holes.

The issue with drilling with any bit, is often the framers only use one kelly screw and it is so easy to rip the stud out with anything that spins.

Cheers
John
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