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Old 08-15-2019, 01:07 PM   #41
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Quote:
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Are you sure it wasn't 2002 code cycle? IIRC, GFCI protection had to be installed with that code update.

(I'm not that old, but ESA has their look up tool and referenced the date it came into effect... I had to look this up for a home inspector one day...)

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Ok, now you got me looking.

It was not in the Canadian code but yes, it was in the 2002 Ontario code.

It is in the 2002 Ontario code book as an Ontario only amendment and it was for receptacles within 1 meter of a kitchen sink. (It came into effect in Ontario, Jan 1st, 2003)

In 2006 it changed to 1.5 meters (which applies to all sinks), was in both the CEC and the OESC and still applies today.


FYI;

Other than in a kitchen, GFI protection was only required for receptacles within 3 meters of sinks, and that started in the 1990 CEC.
Any receptacle in a bathroom had to be GFI protected though, and that started in the 1972 code. Before that, any bathroom receptacle had to be connected using an isolation transformer and kept as far from the tub as possible.


As for the 20 amp alternative to split receptacles code for kitchens, it actually came in the 1998 Canadian and Ontario books.
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Old 09-06-2019, 11:52 PM   #42
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You can put two GFI on a 3 wire.You are feeding the line side of both gfi receptacles and the line side doesnt care about or detect an imbalance on the neutral.
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Old 09-07-2019, 09:54 AM   #43
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I, for one, was tired of reading of all the deaths attributed to receptacles near sinks in kitchens.
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Old 09-07-2019, 10:15 AM   #44
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I, for one, was tired of reading of all the deaths attributed to receptacles near sinks in kitchens.
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Old 09-07-2019, 10:25 PM   #45
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Look here, cupcake. First, if there is a specific opinion that you would rather not get to your questions, then please specify so on your original post. Would save both of us some time.

Second, the question you asked here, as well as that other post, seem to indicate you are looking for a way to circumvent the CEC. If that is the case, that is not what this forum is about. If the answers you received to not fit your budget, there's not a lot further we can do. If that's not the case, then perhaps you need to word your requests and replies in a manner that can help us help you.

Shall we start again?
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Old 09-07-2019, 11:24 PM   #46
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I ran into this ethical dilemma in my own 40-year old townhouse I bought in February.

The kitchen had(s) two duplex countertop receptacles, each a 3-wire split receptacle, each on a regular 15A 2-pole breaker.

Only one is within 1.5m of the sink. There's two always-plugged-in, high-amp loads plugged into each half of that receptacle, but nothing handheld that can be dropped into the sink.

My cheap a$$ has so far only changed the old split duplex near the sink to a split decora when I replaced every switch and receptacle in the house. I should probably bite the bullet sooner or later and buy the damn 2-pole GFCI breaker, or abandon a circuit and toss a GCFI receptacle in there.

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Old 09-08-2019, 09:45 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by Ink&Brass View Post
I ran into this ethical dilemma in my own 40-year old townhouse I bought in February.

The kitchen had(s) two duplex countertop receptacles, each a 3-wire split receptacle, each on a regular 15A 2-pole breaker.

Only one is within 1.5m of the sink. There's two always-plugged-in, high-amp loads plugged into each half of that receptacle, but nothing handheld that can be dropped into the sink.

My cheap a$$ has so far only changed the old split duplex near the sink to a split decora when I replaced every switch and receptacle in the house. I should probably bite the bullet sooner or later and buy the damn 2-pole GFCI breaker, or abandon a circuit and toss a GCFI receptacle in there.
There is no requirement to change your counter plugs unless you are renovating under a permit.
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Old 09-08-2019, 10:47 PM   #48
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There is no requirement to change your counter plugs unless you are renovating under a permit.
As I know, you are correct, but code aside, I do believe retrofitting the 2-pole breaker that feeds that split 15A receptacle near the sink with a GFCI 2-pole would be the right thing to do. Especially if I ever decide to father children in this house.
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Old 09-09-2019, 09:04 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ink&Brass View Post
As I know, you are correct, but code aside, I do believe retrofitting the 2-pole breaker that feeds that split 15A receptacle near the sink with a GFCI 2-pole would be the right thing to do. Especially if I ever decide to father children in this house.
Or you could do what I did, front seat of Dodge Ram 2500, and not have to worry about GFCI
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