Running low voltage (48 volt) in cable tray - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!
Go Back   Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum > Electrical Trade Topics > Canadian Electrical Forum


Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By PlugsAndLights
  • 1 Post By emtnut
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-10-2017, 12:44 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 406
Rewards Points: 619
Default Running low voltage (48 volt) in cable tray

Would someone point me to the code section (Canadaian) that covers low voltage conductors in cable tray.

I've been asked to help on a job where they will be running battery cables between racks on cable tray. Battery voltage is 48 VDC. Cable is class II tray cable, single conductor. Circuit protected at source (breaker) and feeds some network equipment.

Single conductor cable, listed and UL Listed As: Central Office Power Cable, CSA AWM I B 105C.

My basic question is: Can it be run as single condutor in the tray, or will it need physical protection (i.e PVC pipe/flex etc).

The exact cable proposed is Southwire Telcoflex II

http://www.southwire.com/ProductCata...rodcatsheet439

(PS: The journeman will call it here, I was just looking to impress him by being somewhat informed ahead of time).
RFguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Join Contractor Talk

Join the #1 Electrician Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

ElectricianTalk.com - Are you a Professional Electrical Contractor? If so we invite you to join our community and see what it has to offer. Our site is specifically designed for you and it's the leading place for electricians to meet online. No homeowners asking DIY questions. Just fellow tradesmen who enjoy talking about their business, their trade, and anything else that comes up. No matter what your specialty is you'll find that ElectricianTalk.com is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally free!

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here JOIN FOR FREE


Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ElectricianTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-10-2017, 07:36 AM   #2
Safety Pin Member
 
PlugsAndLights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Eastern Ontario
Posts: 2,255
Rewards Points: 2,880
Default

Couple things you might look at:
Section 0 glossary - extra low voltage, low voltage, high voltage
Section 16 - Class I, II etc
Table 19 - Conditions of use
P&L
MikeMan and emtnut like this.
__________________
Malignant narcissism is a psychological syndrome comprising an extreme mix of narcissism, antisocial personality disorder, aggression, and sadism.[1] Often grandiose, and always ready to raise hostility levels, the malignant narcissist undermines organizations in which they are involved, and dehumanizes the people with whom they associate.
PlugsAndLights is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2017, 12:05 PM   #3
Band Member
 
emtnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Eastern Ontario
Posts: 5,807
Rewards Points: 1,192
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RFguy View Post
Would someone point me to the code section (Canadaian) that covers low voltage conductors in cable tray.

I've been asked to help on a job where they will be running battery cables between racks on cable tray. Battery voltage is 48 VDC. Cable is class II tray cable, single conductor. Circuit protected at source (breaker) and feeds some network equipment.

Single conductor cable, listed and UL Listed As: Central Office Power Cable, CSA AWM I B 105C.

My basic question is: Can it be run as single condutor in the tray, or will it need physical protection (i.e PVC pipe/flex etc).

The exact cable proposed is Southwire Telcoflex II

http://www.southwire.com/ProductCata...rodcatsheet439

(PS: The journeman will call it here, I was just looking to impress him by being somewhat informed ahead of time).
You are still required to follow section 12, since it is not power limited (sec 16).
As P&L mentioned, Table 19 shows uses for cables.
On the cable spec you posted, It's cable tray rated if 1/0 or larger
PlugsAndLights likes this.
__________________
_____________________________________
Your Mother was a hamster, and your father smells of Elderberries. ... Now go away, or I shall taunt you a second time
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by emtnut; 02-10-2017 at 01:22 PM.
emtnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-11-2017, 09:16 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Byte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Calgary
Posts: 467
Rewards Points: 934
Default

As long as their insulation rating is equal, they can lay in the same tray; however, separation may be required.
Raceway — any channel designed for holding wires, cables, or busbars, and, unless otherwise qualified in the Rules of this Code, the term includes conduit (rigid and flexible, metal and non-metallic), electrical metallic and non-metallic tubing, underfloor raceways, cellular floors, surface raceways, wireways, cable trays, busways, and auxiliary gutters.
(2) No raceway or compartment of a multiple-channel raceway shall contain conductors that are connected to different power or distribution transformers or other different sources of voltage, except where the conductors
(a) are separated by the metal armour or metal sheath of cable assemblies of the types listed in Table 19;
(b) are separated by a barrier of sheet steel not less than 1.34 mm (No. 16 MSG) thick or a flame-******ant non-metallic insulating material not less than 1.5 mm in thickness; or
(c) are used for the supply and/or control of remote devices, are insulated for at least the same voltage as that of the circuit having the highest voltage, and none of the conductors of the circuits of lower voltages is directly connected to a lighting branch circuit.
Byte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2017, 08:24 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 29
Rewards Points: 29
Default

Think plugsandlights is making a joke. I approve. I believe extra low voltage, commonly called low voltage is up to 40V, Low voltage is then 41-750V, and High is 750V+. Keep that in mind.
MikeMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Shielded Tray Cable Helmut General Electrical Discussion 8 01-07-2017 10:08 PM
How to increase the working voltage of a cable? Anthony666 Other Codes and Standards 18 09-24-2016 08:24 AM
Ground/Shield VFD cable termination Kris Wu General Electrical Discussion 8 07-07-2016 12:58 PM
clarification: cable tray example... stonewhite NEC Code Forum 2 06-02-2016 05:56 PM
cable tray raising eyes NEC Code Forum 7 02-01-2016 12:42 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | PlumbingZone.com | RoofingTalk.com