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Old 12-18-2019, 08:19 PM   #21
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So you're saying that you could terminate a 200A circuit (assuming you could fit the wire in, which you couldn't) to a 30A dx as long as the voltage is at or below the rating...
Yes as long as the wire fits you are good to go.

Lets say you did this in real life. A 200 amp breaker will be protecting the wire to the disconnect and the wire can handle 200 amps so that side is good.

Now you fuse to 60 amps and the wire on the load side is rated for 60 amps so that side is good.

The fuse will blow at 60 amps so the circuit will never be able to go higher than 60 amps unless there is a fault. If the fault is on the line side the breaker will clear the fault before the wire burns. If the fault is on the load side the fuses will clear the fault before the 60 amp wire burns. (always a good idea to label the max size fuse allowed)

I personally would not use a wire rated less than the breaker even if the breaker can be neutered to 70 amps (and labelled). I would either run wire capable of supporting 100 amps or install fuses close to the breaker.

Now what affect it has on arc fault is something you would have to disgust with a engineer.
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Old 12-18-2019, 08:47 PM   #22
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So you're saying that you could terminate a 200A circuit (assuming you could fit the wire in, which you couldn't) to a 30A dx as long as the voltage is at or below the rating...
How is that any different than coming off of a 200A splitter and terminating into a 30A disconnect. As long as the wire is sized appropriately feeding the disconnect (splitter rule, or sized for the main current), the you're good to go.

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Old 12-18-2019, 08:50 PM   #23
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Also, the OP has more attitude than a 14 year old girl .

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Old 12-19-2019, 01:34 PM   #24
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OK guys, I just spoke to the technical support for GE, and I got news for you. You're all wrong! If the disconnect is rated at 60 A, the most you can connect to it is 60A PERIOD!! It doesn't matter what the lugs you're terminating on are rated for. It doesn't matter if the dx is service rated. There is no way the manufacturer will warranty a failure of any sort, much less advise you to connect a circuit rated higher than the rating of the disconnect. This is straight from the manufacturer.

Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.

Who has the attitude now Mobius87???
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Old 12-19-2019, 01:40 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by iwannawaterski View Post
OK guys, I just spoke to the technical support for GE, and I got news for you. You're all wrong! If the disconnect is rated at 60 A, the most you can connect to it is 60A PERIOD!! It doesn't matter what the lugs you're terminating on are rated for. It doesn't matter if the dx is service rated. There is no way the manufacturer will warranty a failure of any sort, much less advise you to connect a circuit rated higher than the rating of the disconnect. This is straight from the manufacturer.

Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.

Who has the attitude now Mobius87???


So GE’s Service rated disconnect that is connected to an unfused utility service is now fake news? I think you might’ve misunderstood the info you’ve received.


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Old 12-19-2019, 01:41 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by iwannawaterski View Post
OK guys, I just spoke to the technical support for GE, and I got news for you. You're all wrong! If the disconnect is rated at 60 A, the most you can connect to it is 60A PERIOD!! It doesn't matter what the lugs you're terminating on are rated for. It doesn't matter if the dx is service rated. There is no way the manufacturer will warranty a failure of any sort, much less advise you to connect a circuit rated higher than the rating of the disconnect. This is straight from the manufacturer.

Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.

Who has the attitude now Mobius87???
Clearly still you. Yes, if you have a 60A disconnect you can only connect a 60A LOAD to it (generally speaking)...... but you can FEED the LINE from a a higher amperage feed as long as you follow the appropriate codes. Holy crap, I'm glad I'm not your co-worker. I'm sure you're beloved.

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Old 12-19-2019, 01:43 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwannawaterski View Post
OK guys, I just spoke to the technical support for GE, and I got news for you. You're all wrong! If the disconnect is rated at 60 A, the most you can connect to it is 60A PERIOD!! It doesn't matter what the lugs you're terminating on are rated for. It doesn't matter if the dx is service rated. There is no way the manufacturer will warranty a failure of any sort, much less advise you to connect a circuit rated higher than the rating of the disconnect. This is straight from the manufacturer.

Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.

Who has the attitude now Mobius87???
This would be a good time to stop posting and walk away.
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Old 12-19-2019, 04:00 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by iwannawaterski View Post
Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.
So lets say you have a 400 amp disconnect feeding a 400 amp splitter trough. Off of that splitter trough you have four 80 amp loads so you install four 100 amp fused disconnects following the tap conductor rules for wire size for the feeds to those disconnects.

Are you trying to say that would be incorrect?

So each one of those disconnects must be 400 amp disconnects? If so, why is there even a tap conductor code?
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Old 12-19-2019, 06:53 PM   #29
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So lets say you have a 400 amp disconnect feeding a 400 amp splitter trough. Off of that splitter trough you have four 80 amp loads so you install four 100 amp fused disconnects following the tap conductor rules for wire size for the feeds to those disconnects.

Are you trying to say that would be incorrect?

So each one of those disconnects must be 400 amp disconnects? If so, why is there even a tap conductor code?
I'd like to see the fuse reducers for that.

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Old 12-19-2019, 07:19 PM   #30
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And this boys and girls is why phoning technical support is a waste of time and forums like this exist.

Sometimes you guys are aggressive when you post but i never take it to heart as you have probably had to work with a apprentice like this prick all day and your just blowing of some steam.
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Old 12-19-2019, 07:23 PM   #31
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And this boys and girls is why phoning technical support is a waste of time and forums like this exist.

Sometimes you guys are aggressive when you post but i never take it to heart as you have probably had to work with a apprentice like this prick all day and your just blowing of some steam.
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Old 12-19-2019, 08:44 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by iwannawaterski View Post
OK guys, I just spoke to the technical support for GE, and I got news for you. You're all wrong! If the disconnect is rated at 60 A, the most you can connect to it is 60A PERIOD!! It doesn't matter what the lugs you're terminating on are rated for. It doesn't matter if the dx is service rated. There is no way the manufacturer will warranty a failure of any sort, much less advise you to connect a circuit rated higher than the rating of the disconnect. This is straight from the manufacturer.

Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.

Who has the attitude now Mobius87???
Pudge, why are you hiding behind this homo screen name?
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Old 12-19-2019, 09:39 PM   #33
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240.21
Location in circuit. Overcorrect protection shall be provided in each ungrounded circuit conductor and shall be located at the point where the conductors receive their supply except as specified in 240.21(A) through (G).

I don't see anything in (A) through (G) that allows a conductor to be protected by a fused disconnect that's more than 25' from the breaker that feeds it.
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Old 12-19-2019, 09:53 PM   #34
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240.21
Location in circuit. Overcorrect protection shall be provided in each ungrounded circuit conductor and shall be located at the point where the conductors receive their supply except as specified in 240.21(A) through (G).

I don't see anything in (A) through (G) that allows a conductor to be protected by a fused disconnect that's more than 25' from the breaker that feeds it.


He has a 70 amp breaker at the point of origin. Tap rule doesn’t apply


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Old 12-19-2019, 10:36 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by iwannawaterski View Post
OK guys, I just spoke to the technical support for GE, and I got news for you. You're all wrong! If the disconnect is rated at 60 A, the most you can connect to it is 60A PERIOD!! It doesn't matter what the lugs you're terminating on are rated for. It doesn't matter if the dx is service rated. There is no way the manufacturer will warranty a failure of any sort, much less advise you to connect a circuit rated higher than the rating of the disconnect. This is straight from the manufacturer.

Everybody that is using the tap rule to size down a circuit from a higher amperage to a lower one and terminating on a disconnect that isn't rated at the higher amperage or greater is DOING IT INCORRECTLY according to the manufacturer.

Who has the attitude now Mobius87???
Sounds like good advice from tech support
Next time I Install a new 200a residential service, I have to call the power company and find out what size transformer and fuse they are connecting to my equipment. If they tell me 400a, I have to use 400a riser, meter socket and loadcenter, but get a 200a main for this loadcenter?
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Old 12-19-2019, 11:19 PM   #36
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This Mike Holt's troll account. You can tell by the water ski name. Mike is an avid participant in the gayest sport on planet Earth, barefoot skiing. He's angry that this forum is getting posts.
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Old 12-20-2019, 12:00 AM   #37
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Pudge, why are you hiding behind this homo screen name?
How dare you?
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Old 12-20-2019, 12:27 AM   #38
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How dare you?
Very well, thank you.
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Old 12-20-2019, 06:57 AM   #39
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So GE’s Service rated disconnect that is connected to an unfused utility service is now fake news? I think you might’ve misunderstood the info you’ve received.
This is the part I am wondering about, which end of that phone call was the dumbass?

I would not be surprised if it was the people they have answer the phones at GE. Most of the manufacturers seem to hire big call centers full of Home Depot level help to screen calls for the engineers. They read and interpret what they can find on the manufacturer's web site off to the caller. I guess on a boring day they will interpret it to the best of their abilities and training they received in a three hour seminar at the Sheraton.

I get dopey answers all the time when I call. Sometimes you can drill through the telephone gatekeepers and get to a grown up but it's tough.
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