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Certified Organic A-Hole
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Ok I have a question about a high leg delta transformer. I know that phases A and C to neutral you get 120 and that phase B to neutral you get 208. I also know that between any two phases you get 240. My question is why don't you get 328 volts from phase B to either phase A or C? I believe it has to do with the was the sine waves are off from each other but am not totally sure. Does any one have a good explaination? Or maybe a diagram of the sine waves?
 

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208 / three phase

I am an electronic technician by trade, not an electrician, but have been forced into performing electrician type work from time to time. I am always reluctant to more than the most basic work - I know the difference, and my limitations.

Anyway, 208V has always been a bit of a mystery to me, but your diagram using the triangle and pythagorean theory finally made it very clear to me.

My only question now, is why do we use 208V in the first place?

Thanks,

Goober Pat
 

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I am an electronic technician by trade, not an electrician, but have been forced into performing electrician type work from time to time. I am always reluctant to more than the most basic work - I know the difference, and my limitations.

Anyway, 208V has always been a bit of a mystery to me, but your diagram using the triangle and pythagorean theory finally made it very clear to me.

My only question now, is why do we use 208V in the first place?

Thanks,

Goober Pat
The 208 V in the delta setup is just an artifact. We don't use it. In a three phase wye connected system where we want single phase 120 V, the phase to phase voltage turns out to be 208, and we use this just like we would 240 V in a single phase system, or all three phases for large loads.
 

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I must say in my 30+ years in the trade I have never seen a transformer like that.
Why would one use this?
 

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I must say in my 30+ years in the trade I have never seen a transformer like that.
Why would one use this?
It was used here alot for heavy commercial and industrial buildings with lots of motors. There is less stress on a delta connected transformer from heavy motor starts than on a wye. And, of course, there is alot of single phase 240 V equipment as well as 240 V three phase stuff. And you need 120 V for general power and lighting, so the 120/240 V delta is pretty good for that.

Of course, the 208 V high leg isn't used for anything normally.
 

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In which case, that is called an "open delta" service.
 

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why don't you get 328 volts from phase B to either phase A or C?
Because, that's the way it is.

In my line of work, I don't need to know everything. My brain isn't big enough so I limit my knowledge to "need to know" :jester:
 

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Of which has 57% capacity of a three transformer bank if the transformers are of the same KVA rating. Most 240 delta banks I've seen have a large pot with a smaller " kicker" pot.
 

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Bilge Rat
motors and controls.........
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Too bad that POCOs are not connecting deltas as much anymore.

A closed delta (3 transformers) will tend to balance voltage. This is why 480 to 120/208 transformers are almost always delta on the 480 side. Also why most larger motors are delta connected.

If there were 3 transformers on a pole connected wye on the primary, and delta on the secondary, and you opened one of the cut-outs, you'd still have 3 phase power available on the secondary. If you completely remove one of the transformers, you'd still have 3 phase at the secondary.

Voltage balance is very critical to 3 phase motors, and POCOs must maintain it within certain tolerances. Since they are getting away from delta secondaries, most of them are getting away from wye-wye padmounts in favor of delta-wye.

Rob
 

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usually orange tape
 

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Light Emitting Decoration
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My only question now, is why do we use 208V in the first place?
I don't think it was chosen. It's just a consequence of choosing desired "primary use" voltage.

208Y/120v is used where a lot of 120v plug-in loads are expected. Many motors can run on 208v as well to take advantage of 208v. Apartment complex is a good example. Each unit definitely needs 120v outlets, yet three phase is available for large motors needed for elevators.

EU countries used to have nominal voltages ranging from 220 to 240v for plug-in loads. Now, they simply changed the nominal to 230 and places that used to be 220 go by -10% +6% tolerance and places that were 240 go by -6% +10% tolerance. I believe Mexico and Brazil chose 220v as the "main" voltage, so they have 220Y/127v. They have the same outlets we do, but nominal is 127v.

277v is also a "secondary" voltage. 480v was chosen for 480Y/277v to power three phase machines and single phase 277v is pretty much only used for lighting.

Over at Canadiana, they use 600Y/347v and put things together using square indented screws.
 
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