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I do very little residential in the course of my employment, since we mostly concentrate on commercial/institutional work. Occasionally though, i get a chance to do a little resi. the last three houses i have been in have that this type of service ground.

it's a 14/2 with both wires twisted together. the service in these pictures also used this method to bond the metal mast. the service is from the 60s

has this method ever been code compliant in Ontario? or is this just something that was never enforced. I have been changing them out to #6 bare, I was just wondering exactly how common this is.
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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I guess someone figured it was better than nothing. I can't imagine that it was ever code compliant.

I personally wouldn't use a #6 bare. I would be using an insulated #6 for that job.
 

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I do very little residential in the course of my employment, since we mostly concentrate on commercial/institutional work. Occasionally though, i get a chance to do a little resi. the last three houses i have been in have that this type of service ground.

it's a 14/2 with both wires twisted together. the service in these pictures also used this method to bond the metal mast. the service is from the 60s

has this method ever been code compliant in Ontario? or is this just something that was never enforced. I have been changing them out to #6 bare, I was just wondering exactly how common this is.
Luck has been on their side. The majority of lightning strikes on buildings are just a fractured portion of the main bolt. If the premise has ever had a minor strike the 14/2 may have saved the day.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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I guess someone figured it was better than nothing. I can't imagine that it was ever code compliant.

I personally wouldn't use a #6 bare. I would be using an insulated #6 for that job.
Nothing wrong with #6 bare, but I would tape it (green of course) in the disconnect.
Better yet, if you are demoing some of the wiring, save some of the loom and slide it over the new ground wire.
Seen some weird stuff, but never 14/2 used like that :eek:
 

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IBEW L.U. 1852
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Nothing wrong with #6 bare, but I would tape it (green of course) in the disconnect.
Better yet, if you are demoing some of the wiring, save some of the loom and slide it over the new ground wire.
Seen some weird stuff, but never 14/2 used like that :eek:
Agreed......I was suggesting the same thing.......insulate that thing in the disco.
 

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When I swapped out my Grandfather's water heater a couple years back that was on a demand meter (lower rate), it was fed with 14/4 tar covered romex. They paralleled the 14s to get 30A capacity. Pretty dang clever. He was a bit sad when I replaced it with bright orange 10/2, and said it was tidy (he was a sparky from 1940 until 2000 when he didn't renew his license), but ugly as sin. Wish I took a picture, as it was pretty neat.
 

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Going_Commando said:
When I swapped out my Grandfather's water heater a couple years back that was on a demand meter (lower rate), it was fed with 14/4 tar covered romex. They paralleled the 14s to get 30A capacity. Pretty dang clever. He was a bit sad when I replaced it with bright orange 10/2, and said it was tidy (he was a sparky from 1940 until 2000 when he didn't renew his license), but ugly as sin. Wish I took a picture, as it was pretty neat.
Fixed a subpanel for an engineer friend that had 2 pieces of 10/3 feeding a 60a subpanel from a 60a brkr.... No no no......
 
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