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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where is this exception in the code? Is this still legal, or did it die a long time ago? Last place I worked was still doing this for the SL on romex & MC jobs.

I know this question has been beat to death, but hook me up.
 

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II. Branch-Circuit Ratings
210.19 Conductors — Minimum Ampacity and Size.
(A) Branch Circuits Not More Than 600 Volts.
(1) General. Branch-circuit conductors shall have an ampacity
not less than the maximum load to be served. Where
a branch circuit supplies continuous loads or any combination
of continuous and noncontinuous loads, the minimum
branch-circuit conductor size, before the application of any
adjustment or correction factors, shall have an allowable
ampacity not less than the noncontinuous load plus
125 percent of the continuous load.
Exception No. 1: Where the assembly, including the overcurrent
devices protecting the branch circuit(s), is listed for
operation at 100 percent of its rating, the allowable ampacity
of the branch circuit conductors shall be permitted to be
not less than the sum of the continuous load plus the noncontinuous
load.
Exception No. 2: Grounded conductors that are not connected
to an overcurrent device shall be permitted to be
sized at 100 percent of the continuous and noncontinuous
load.
FPN No. 1: See 310.15 for ampacity ratings of conductors.
FPN No. 2: See Part II of Article 430 for minimum rating
of motor branch-circuit conductors.
FPN No. 3: See 310.10 for temperature limitation of
conductors.
FPN No. 4: Conductors for branch circuits as defined in
Article 100, sized to prevent a voltage drop exceeding
3 percent at the farthest outlet of power, heating, and lighting
loads, or combinations of such loads, and where the
maximum total voltage drop on both feeders and branch
circuits to the farthest outlet does not exceed 5 percent,
provide reasonable efficiency of operation. See FPN No. 2
of 215.2(A)(3) for voltage drop on feeder conductors.
(2) Multioutlet Branch Circuits. Conductors of branch
circuits supplying more than one receptacle for cord-andplug-
connected portable loads shall have an ampacity of
not less than the rating of the branch circuit.
(3) Household Ranges and Cooking Appliances. Branchcircuit
conductors supplying household ranges, wallmounted
ovens, counter-mounted cooking units, and other
household cooking appliances shall have an ampacity not
less than the rating of the branch circuit and not less than
the maximum load to be served. For ranges of 83⁄4 kW or
more rating, the minimum branch-circuit rating shall be 40
amperes.
Exception No. 1: Conductors tapped from a 50-ampere
branch circuit supplying electric ranges, wall-mounted
electric ovens, and counter-mounted electric cooking units
shall have an ampacity of not less than 20 amperes and
shall be suffıcient for the load to be served. These tap conductors
include any conductors that are a part of the leads
supplied with the appliance that are smaller than the
branch-circuit conductors. The taps shall not be longer
than necessary for servicing the appliance.
Exception No. 2: The neutral conductor of a 3-wire branch
circuit supplying a household electric range, a wallmounted
oven, or a counter-mounted cooking unit shall be
permitted to be smaller than the ungrounded conductors
where the maximum demand of a range of 83⁄4-kW or more
rating has been calculated according to Column C of Table
220.55, but such conductor shall have an ampacity of not
less than 70 percent of the branch-circuit rating and shall
not be smaller than 10 AWG.
(4) Other Loads. Branch-circuit conductors that supply
loads other than those specified in 210.2 and other than
cooking appliances as covered in 210.19(A)(3) shall have
an ampacity sufficient for the loads served and shall not be
smaller than 14 AWG.
Exception No. 1: Tap conductors shall have an ampacity
suffıcient for the load served. In addition, they shall have an
ampacity of not less than 15 for circuits rated less than 40
amperes and not less than 20 for circuits rated at 40 or 50
amperes and only where these tap conductors supply any of
the following loads:
(a) Individual lampholders or luminaires with taps extending
not longer than 450 mm (18 in.) beyond any portion
of the lampholder or luminaire.
(b) A luminaire having tap conductors as provided in
410.117.
(c) Individual outlets, other than receptacle outlets,
with taps not over 450 mm (18 in.) long.
(d) Infrared lamp industrial heating appliances.
(e) Nonheating leads of deicing and snow-melting
cables and mats.
Exception No. 2: Fixture wires and flexible cords shall be
permitted to be smaller than 14 AWG as permitted by
240.5.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The whip from the j-box to the light fixture.

Have 28 MH fixtures that ill be replacing. The new whips will be about 12-15 ft long. I want to do them all with 14/2 MC. Existing fixtures hang from 3/4 ridgid.
 

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I can't back this up with any code article but it's my gut feeling that you should use #12 for your drops since you are making them yourself.

I order 6'-14/3 whips that have a UL listing on it for use with luminaries.
Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using electriciantalk.com mobile app
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I can't back this up with any code article but it's my gut feeling that you should use #12 for your drops since you are making them yourself.

I order 14/3 whips that have a UL listing on it for use with luminaries.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using electriciantalk.com mobile app
I dont know much about this exception. Ive always used #12 on a 20 amp circuit. But the last place I worked at did some offices where 14/2 was pulled for ALL the switch legs. All on 20 amp circuits.

Now I've got a job where this would really work out, if there aren't all restrictions on the lengths of the whips or the method used.
 

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MHElectric said:
I dont know much about this exception. Ive always used #12 on a 20 amp circuit. But the last place I worked at did some offices where 14/2 was pulled for ALL the switch legs. All on 20 amp circuits. Now I've got a job where this would really work out, if there aren't all restrictions on the lengths of the whips or the method used.
Again, there is a HUGE difference between fixture whips and switch legs. All switch legs are required to be sized in accordance to the ocpd. The fixture whip can be smaller. I have installed many fixtures with 16 and even 18 awg fixture whips. I know you know this "MH". But to clarify for some of the others.
 

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I have ordered 20" whips factory installed on hi bay T5 fixtures so I didn't have to move boxes. It saved labor and material. I think they were 14 awg. If I were making them in the field I'm not sure of the code implications because they wouldn't be part of the "listed assembly" of the fixture.

240.5.B.2 seem to allow it I suppose.
 

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I know this doesn't help but CEC allows this install.

30-412 Tap connection conductorsNo. 14 AWG copper tap connection conductors shall be permitted for a single luminaire and for luminaries mounted in a continuous row as specified in Rule 30-310(1), on a branch circuit protected by an overcurrentdevice rated or set at 20 A, provided that the tap connection conductors
(a) have an ampacity not less than the rating of the single luminaire or the luminaires mounted in a continuous-row as specified in Rule 30-310(1); and
(b) do not exceed 7.5 m in length.
 
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