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Rezy jman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Something I've run into a couple times in the last month is appliances that are cord connected that pulled 18a and 19a respectively. One was a blow dryer for salon and the other is for a plug in Sauna or something. Haven't seen it was just texted a photo for a client.

Technically speaking we can't load breakers up to more than 80% unless proven to be non continuous correct?

How do you go about making something that is meant to be in a 20a receptacle but yet is rated to pull more than 16a code compliant?

Real world application I put it on 12awg or 10awg wire and a 25a breaker and it's nice and safe but you have a 20a device on a 25a breaker which isn't code compliant. Also 25a breakers aren't very common.
 

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You are not loading up anything. You are installing a 20A receptacle for an appliance with a 20A plug. The appliance manufacturer accepts all responsibility from the cord cap on.

I never worry about current draw in such cases. I look for an approval marking and install an outlet for the provided plug.
 

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I don't think a hair blower is considered continuous.
 
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Rezy jman
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You are not loading up anything. You are installing a 20A receptacle for an appliance with a 20A plug. The appliance manufacturer accepts all responsibility from the cord cap on.

I never worry about current draw in such cases. I look for an approval marking and install an outlet for the provided plug.
Right, that makes sense except the breaker was tripping from the blow dryer so I had to start worrying.

You are not loading up anything. You are installing a 20A receptacle for an appliance with a 20A plug. The appliance manufacturer accepts all responsibility from the cord cap on.

I never worry about current draw in such cases. I look for an approval marking and install an outlet for the provided plug.
Right, ya I guess what gets plugs into outlets is beyond our concern when it comes to code compliance. Just odd cause pulling 19a with a Sauna heater is likely to cause tripping issues as that's going to be on fairly continuously. I already had tripping problems with the blow dryers.
 

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Right, that makes sense except the breaker was tripping from the blow dryer so I had to start worrying.



Right, ya I guess what gets plugs into outlets is beyond our concern when it comes to code compliance. Just odd cause pulling 19a with a Sauna heater is likely to cause tripping issues as that's going to be on fairly continuously. I already had tripping problems with the blow dryers.

Why is 18A tripping a 20A breaker?
 

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Real world application I put it on 12awg or 10awg wire and a 25a breaker and it's nice and safe but you have a 20a device on a 25a breaker which isn't code compliant. Also 25a breakers aren't very common.
There's a good reason for that !
 

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Manufactures that get their products tested and labeled can do what ever passes the test.
Electric water heaters are usually wired in 12 solid, the the 10 or greater we have to provide.

If you want to see some really crazy numbers look at conductors in free air for the utilities.
I have seen #2 AL feeding a 200 amp residential panel.
 

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It's not like you could modify the blow dryer by going to a higher ampacity receptacle and cord body. I would check with the manufacture to see what it should really be pulling. 18 amps seems a bit high. Maybe it's time for a new one. You could sell it as a way to save energy and reduce cost for the customers daily operation.
 

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Do you know for sure the only thing on the circuit when it tripped was the hair drier?
A 20 amp breaker will hold 22 amps all day, then maybe trip look at a curve.

Cowboy
 
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Maybe the hair dryer is pointed at the breaker panel.......
 

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If a 20 amp breaker won't hold 18 amps continuously and it's not being heated up by an adjacent breaker, it's a bad breaker.
 

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Hair dryers have, at least, two oddities from a code point of view. Their certification checks power ratings once stabilized, so a lot have fairly large startup current but it should be brief. They also have, if intended for a 15A circuit, can actually be rated and draw normally over 12A. I don't really understand why this is a thing, but it's a thing. So seeing a 15A rated product with a 5-15P would likely draw 15A continuously and draw more during a startup or whatever transitions it may have.
This can mean that manufacturers can work on assumptions of breaker current trip times and that bathrooms circuits are typically dedicated circuits, to build a 'more power'ful type of product.

At least that only applies with 15A plugs, not 20A so at least it's not too crazy. But it is quite easy to see why hair dryers are often popping old and overused circuits fairly easy.

That said, if a 5-15P product draws continuously over 15A i wouldn't even care if it's approved or not, i'd take that out and refuse to accept it.
 

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You are not loading up anything. You are installing a 20A receptacle for an appliance with a 20A plug. The appliance manufacturer accepts all responsibility from the cord cap on.

I never worry about current draw in such cases. I look for an approval marking and install an outlet for the provided plug.
I think the pertinent info to take away from this post is find the approval mark. otherwise do your self and your client a favor and notify them that they may have trouble
 
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