Electrician Talk banner
21 - 40 of 74 Posts

·
Light Bender
plumber
Joined
·
7,136 Posts
?

I’m confused. What’s the issue here?

Is there a requirement in the NEC that says the factory supplied terminals strips used to connect the bare bond wires need to be connected together with a conductor or a green coloured screw?

Big commercial panels will have many of these (ground strips) to install on both sides of the panel to land all the bare bond wires from all the many circuits.

Are you saying they need to be connected together with a conductor ? If so, what a ridiculous requirement that is.
 

·
Bootlegger
Joined
·
4,378 Posts
???

They are always connected to the panel box. And breaker panels are always metal.

When would a panel ever actually need a conductor connecting these?
I agree. Probably 99% of time anyway.

I've never seen a fiberglass panel board, but I would imagine they're out there somewhere for some application. It's the only time I could think of.
 

·
Light Bender
plumber
Joined
·
7,136 Posts
???

They are always connected to the panel box. And breaker panels are always metal.

When would a panel ever actually need a conductor connecting these?
I agree. Probably 99% of time anyway.

I've never seen a fiberglass panel board, but I would imagine they're out there somewhere for some application. It's the only time I could think of.
I’ve never seen a fibreglass panel, I doubt they exist. And if they did, the bonding terminals would be connected from the manufacturer I bet.

That’s why I’m confused with the question from the OP as it is not required with a metal breaker panel.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
39,205 Posts
The confusing thing here is why would one would thnk you would need to connect the ground bars I the first place? Cannot recall even seeing this in the most intricate detailed job spec
Yup, but people went with it which made it more confusing.

Maybe they were confusing connecting multiple neutral bars? Or in the case of a service panel, you can put neutrals on a ground bar if you connect it with a large enough busbar or conductor.

But for ground bars, just attach them to the panel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
I’ve never seen a fibreglass panel, I doubt they exist. And if they did, the bonding terminals would be connected from the manufacturer I bet.

That’s why I’m confused with the question from the OP as it is not required with a metal breaker panel.
Apparently the OP has someone telling him that he must, or for some reason is wondering if it's necessary.
As far as fiberglass panels, they have existed. I have seen 1 Square D Trilliant panel, which are no longer being made.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,048 Posts
I’ve never seen a fibreglass panel, I doubt they exist. And if they did, the bonding terminals would be connected from the manufacturer I bet.

That’s why I’m confused with the question from the OP as it is not required with a metal breaker panel.
In Europe, they are used extensively
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,048 Posts
Apparently the OP has AN IDIOT INSPECTOR telling him that he must, or for some reason is wondering if it's necessary.
As far as fiberglass panels, they have existed. I have seen 1 Square D Trilliant panel, which are no longer being made.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
Fixed it for you.
 

·
Registered
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
5,043 Posts
No,

Did it come from the manufacturer that way? NO
Did you install the ground bars? NO

I can guarantee the metal back box has more conducting surface area than a #6 AWG CU.

Common sense is leaving this trade in droves.
This.

And I was surprised I had to get to post #14 to see it.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,236 Posts
Why do you need a Green bonding screw for a ground bar?

I do not think there is any reference to a green screw in the NEC.
Green to indicate a ground. Why are ground screws green on receptacles, and switches, ground pig tails, and other equipment? I didn't say "need", but it would be a clue as to whether it's meant as a bonded bus. My shop vac motor has a ground screw on the motor, even though there's no exposed metal anywhere on the unit. What's the purpose? And it is referenced in the NEC.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
39,205 Posts
Green to indicate a ground. Why are ground screws green on receptacles, and switches, ground pig tails, and other equipment? I didn't say "need", but it would be a clue as to whether it's meant as a bonded bus. My shop vac motor has a ground screw on the motor, even though there's no exposed metal anywhere on the unit. What's the purpose? And it is referenced in the NEC.
What you’re saying is not based in reality.

I’ve never once seen a green screw in a ground bar on a panel. It just doesn’t happen.

The only green screw is the one used as the main bonding jumper through the neutral bar.
 

·
Registered
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
5,043 Posts
Green to indicate a ground. Why are ground screws green on receptacles, and switches, ground pig tails, and other equipment? I didn't say "need", but it would be a clue as to whether it's meant as a bonded bus. My shop vac motor has a ground screw on the motor, even though there's no exposed metal anywhere on the unit. What's the purpose? And it is referenced in the NEC.
Green ground screws are for people in the DIYChatroom.com. Those people may also need help identifying a bonded bus. :wink:
 
  • Like
Reactions: HackWork
21 - 40 of 74 Posts
Top