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Discussion Starter #1
Customer needs a new service, but also needs an upgrade from 150A to 200A. He is older and is having trouble coming up with money for the entire change out. He currently has an over head service going to the meter with SEU going to 150A MCB panel inside the house. The SEU cable is trash on the outside. I was thinking about replacing the SEU to a new meter and adding new 200A MCB service disconnect (to meet new codes) and then running SER (aprox 6') into the house and refeed the 150A panel. Then at a later date after he has some more cash on hand change out the 150A panel to 200A to complete the whole service. Does anyone see any issues with this. Wasn't sure since the Service disconnect is 200A MCB feeding a 150A MCB panel. SEU and SER will be rated for 200A. Thanks.
 

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If the SEU is trash why would you install something that is equal in construction?
Feeding a 150 with a 200 is not going fly with the inspectors. You would even consider this make me pause. There is no time clause in the NEC that I am aware of that would allow this.

What code do you have that requires a 200 amp service? I am not aware of one for the USA.
Has the load increased requiring the change. Or is the equipment so old it is the right thing to do? IE Federal Pacific equipment.
Maybe I missed it, the riser and meter are going to be changed when you go to 200 amps. Maybe not the meter socket but the riser for sure. This will require coordination with you local regulations.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The SEU is really old, so it needs replaced, time just makes things go bad, no reason why it can't just be replaced with new cable.
I was talking about the service disconnect being the new 2020 code (not upgrading to 200A) when taking down the meter and changing out the panel, a service disconnect is now required for the new install. The reason for the service change is the panel is also old, rusting out, and crammed tight, it needs to go. The cost of a 150A panel is the same as a 200 and more and has less breaker space. This was the reason for the upgrade. Already talked with power company and the over head is fine for the upgrade and the whole thing has been coordinated with them. I was just curious if I could do it two part and still be legit, I figured is worth an ask.
I figured it would be a no go, It was a thought and figured I would ask around.
 

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Just a few questions.
What code cycle are you actually on? That determines if you need an outside disconnect or not. Just because the 2020 code is out doesn't mean your municipality has adopted it.
Why would in not be compliant to have a 200A feeder protected by a 200A breaker? If the panel has a 150A main in it, then every part of the system is protected properly.

ETA: looks like you are in Delaware so you are on the 2014. You do not need the outside disconnect. It still might be a good idea to put it in if you are going to change the panel later. That way you don't need to get the power company involved then.

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I don't see any issues either. As long as the SER is sized for 200A, it's fine.

With the tap rules, for that distance you could actually get away with 150A conductors.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Just a few questions.
What code cycle are you actually on? That determines if you need an outside disconnect or not. Just because the 2020 code is out doesn't mean your municipality has adopted it.
Why would in not be compliant to have a 200A feeder protected by a 200A breaker? If the panel has a 150A main in it, then every part of the system is protected properly.

ETA: looks like you are in Delaware so you are on the 2014. You do not need the outside disconnect. It still might be a good idea to put it in if you are going to change the panel later. That way you don't need to get the power company involved then.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk

Yes, Delaware is on 2014 and the disconnect is not required. It is being put in for the ease of being able to change out the 150A panel to a 200A at a later date, as well as helping to break up the cost. The feeder is sized for 200A and the 150A panel has a main breaker. I did not see an issue with it when I was planning the best course of action, just using the forum as a sounding board. Thanks for the reply
 

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No harming in doing it in 2 parts as long as you do the meter/disconnect side first. You may get a few questions from the inspector to ensure that you are not planning to sneak in the panel at a later date with out a permit.
 
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