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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
You say its always worked fine... so 208V used to dry the clothes but now it doesn't? Hmmmm. Duct restriction issue?

Mfr's support is sometimes a little too eager to close their case file.
No It’s a brand new condo did all the electric work in it The owner has been moved in for one month and dryer never heated up properly.
manufacture is telling homeowner that voltage is not high enough for the heating element.
 

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No It’s a brand new condo did all the electric work in it The owner has been moved in for one month and dryer never heated up properly.
manufacture is telling homeowner that voltage is not high enough for the heating element.
Amp clamp it. Volts x Amps = watts.
Watts = heat created.
I bet, as a 99 and 2slow said, probably not a dryer issue. Easy to have ducting obstructed in new build. I wouldn't rule it out without scoping the entire run.
 

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It will still dry the clothes, it will just take longer. Heating elements rated for 240V only give you 75% output at 208V.
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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Is the duct clogged or installed wrong? Multiple dryers sharing one duct? Dryer full of lint?
 

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motors and controls.........
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Have you measured the current the dryer draws?

Most dryers have a 5000 watt 240 volt element plus the motor and controls on one of the legs.

At 120/240 the currents should be 21 on one leg and about 25 or so on the other.

At 120/208 it should be 18 and around 22 or so on the other.

At 240, it'll be 5000 watts, at 208 it'll be 3750.

With the reduced wattage, it'll take longer to dry a load of clothes but not much longer. 60 minutes should be fine. There are thousands of dryers running on 120/208. Manufacturers know this so they design their products to operate on either voltage. Well, most manufacturers anyway.........

It's possible that yours cannot handle 208 but I doubt if this is the problem. As others have stated, check for obstructions in the vent line. Some dryers handle long lines better than others.

Look at the current over a period of time, about a half-hour. If it's around 18 amps and it goes from 18 to 0 often, you have a clogged vent. If it stays at 18 and doesn't dry the clothes, there's problem inside the machine itself.

If you know where the vent exits the building, it should have a pretty strong stream of air when it's running.

As a final note, look at the nameplate. If it's less than 5000 watts, it'll take longer to dry at either voltage.
 

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When you have a 208 3 phase panel why across two legs do you only get 210v but across each phase you get 122 V. So the problem is 240 V Clothes dryer is not coming to full heat because of the low-voltage.
Before this gets shut down you have 3 legs of 120v that are 120 degrees out of phase with one another ,you use square root of. 3 multiply that by 120 and you get 208v. On a 120/240 your transformer is center tapped and you have 2 legs of 120 adding together to make 240v.
 

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Estwing magic
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Everything always worked fine I’ve never had this problem before but for some reason the dryer is not drying the clothes and the manufacturer is telling me because the voltage is not high enough.
If there’s nothing wrong with the dryer, it will dry clothes, it just takes a little longer. What happens if you install a transformer only to find out that there’s an issue with the dryer?

If, like you say, the dryer isn’t drying clothes at all, voltage is not the problem.
 

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Little know secret that a microwave on 240V really makes better hot dogs !
Nuh uh. Watts is watts!


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Nuh uh. Watts is watts!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Nuh uh. Twice the voltage gives you 4X the watts. For a very, very short time. Might still cook a hotdog though, smoke it at least........
 

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Nuh uh. Twice the voltage gives you 4X the watts. For a very, very short time. Might still cook a hotdog though, smoke it at least........
Smoked hotdogs. I like it. Emoji, Emoji
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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Everything always worked fine I’ve never had this problem before but for some reason the dryer is not drying the clothes and the manufacturer is telling me because the voltage is not high enough.
If your side is good, tell them to call an appliance repairman or a painter.
 

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Smoked hotdogs. I like it. Emoji, Emoji
Like that video where the 240 v lines are just attached directly to the hot dog....


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I’m confused. Some posts say it doesn’t dry and some posts say it takes longer. What is it?
I’m voting for taking longer.you still have either phase a or b and neutral to form 120v for the dryer drum motor and controls but only 208 instead of 240 to power the dryer element?
 
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