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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yep. A contractor working in the same bldg as me wanted to show me something. An entire hallway of LED can lights cycling off and on every 30-60 seconds. They were installed this morning in a grid ceiling with no tiles installed yet. Upon further investigation, the fixtures are 120-277v rated, but the thermals were 120v rated. They are wired 277v. He has 2 skids of these fixtures sitting on the floor and 50-60 already installed. image-1061483532.jpg image-2783764045.jpg
 

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Thats weird. I would probably take them all down and see what the supplier can do about a refund or something. I would not trust those. You might just be able to change the thermals but i wouldnt.
 

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Good 'ol Lithonia strikes again. I wish him luck in dealing with the factory. We have very few good things to say about that company, around this shop.
 

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It looks to me like they use a universal driver (120-277), but that the fixture assembly as a whole is only intended to be connected to 120v, hence the 120v thermal. Probably they use the same driver on all models, but other parts are specific to the intended voltage. Just a guess.
 

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It looks to me like they use a universal driver (120-277), but that the fixture assembly as a whole is only intended to be connected to 120v, hence the 120v thermal. Probably they use the same driver on all models, but other parts are specific to the intended voltage. Just a guess.
Thats what im thinking. Its probably just easier for the company to give it a range because of all the variables in the cheap product.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So, it's possible this contractor may just have a lazy contract manager who just picked the first part number for this fixture without researching compatability.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Now that I'm home and can do some research online, It looks like they were just not on the ball when placing their order. Lithhonia's website clearly shows 3 voltage options, 120, 277 & 347. I wonder who will end up paying for that one. I can only assume the contractor will have to make it right on their dime. I suppose in the same situation, I would have to eat the cost to make things right.
 

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Now that I'm home and can do some research online, It looks like they were just not on the ball when placing their order. Lithhonia's website clearly shows 3 voltage options, 120, 277 & 347. I wonder who will end up paying for that one. I can only assume the contractor will have to make it right on their dime. I suppose in the same situation, I would have to eat the cost to make things right.
So, the box shows multi-tap as input but the fixture is not?
 

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send them all back to the manufacturer,
if they are marked as suitable for 277v ?
Then they should work on 277v
If not the manufacturer can replace them

Have you tried wiring two fittings in series
that would give about 138v a piece.

But my first choice is send them back !
 

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send them all back to the manufacturer,
if they are marked as suitable for 277v ?
Then they should work on 277v
If not the manufacturer can replace them

Have you tried wiring two fittings in series
that would give about 138v a piece.

But my first choice is send them back !
Its the contractor's fault. The list number shows its a120 volt fixture. The ballast itself is rated for 277, but the fixture is not. that is just because they used the same ballast in every fixture. It doesn't change the fact that that particular fixture is not intended for use with 277
 

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Discussion Starter #15
mcclary's electrical said:
Its the contractor's fault. The list number shows its a120 volt fixture. The ballast itself is rated for 277, but the fixture is not. that is just because they used the same ballast in every fixture. It doesn't change the fact that that particular fixture is not intended for use with 277
Yep. I'm curious to find out their solution. I will be there again tomorrow to see what happened. I would assume the journeyman on site went home and did a little research and found out his shop screwed up.
 

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Yep. A contractor working in the same bldg as me wanted to show me something. An entire hallway of LED can lights cycling off and on every 30-60 seconds. They were installed this morning in a grid ceiling with no tiles installed yet. Upon further investigation, the fixtures are 120-277v rated, but the thermals were 120v rated. They are wired 277v. He has 2 skids of these fixtures sitting on the floor and 50-60 already installed. View attachment 47449 View attachment 47465
Just for informational purposes why would the "thermal" trip at a higher voltage?
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
RIVETER said:
Just for informational purposes why would the "thermal" trip at a higher voltage?
I'm not sure unless the higher voltage combined with the resistance in the smaller thermal actually caused it to reach its trip temperature pre-maturely.
 
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