Electrician Talk banner

21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,219 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
I'm not sure. There is obviously something about it (the operation of the thermal) related to the voltage applied. Otherwise it wouldn't have a 120 volt rating. It would be multi voltage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,412 Posts
I'm not sure. There is obviously something about it (the operation of the thermal) related to the voltage applied. Otherwise it wouldn't have a 120 volt rating. It would be multi voltage.
As I said, a thermal is just a switch. The only problem that I know of when using a 120 volt switch in a 277volt application is that the higher voltage may possibly arc across the gap. That does not sound like your case. SMARTER people...chime in.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,966 Posts
The only way the thermal can trip is excess heat !
Is the thermal on the fixture or the ballast ?
It could only be on the ballast
As this is the only part that would be working harder
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,219 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
dmxtothemax said:
The only way the thermal can trip is excess heat ! Is the thermal on the fixture or the ballast ? It could only be on the ballast As this is the only part that would be working harder
The driver (ballast) is multi volt 120-277 so it is fine. The only component not rated for the applied voltage is the thermal. They need to replace the fixtures or run 120 v circuits for the can lights. Simply replacing the thermals is possible but would void the listing of the fixture.
 

·
evil bastard
Joined
·
15,771 Posts
A thermal is just a switch...possibly a KLIXON. Where would the heat come from...other than current.
Does that look like a klixon to you? Not even close. It also does not look like the normal cheap dry contacts on most recessed. My guess is there is some solid state circuitry in those thermals.
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top