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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The 1st sentence of 555.5 says
Transformers and enclosures shall be specifically approved for the intended location.
What does that mean to you?

Does it mean it has to say in the literature that it is designed to go on a floating dock?

Would a NEMA 3R transformer with stainless steel enclosure be "approved for the intended location"?

I've got a call in to the plans reviewer to discuss it, but I was wondering what y'all thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
AHJ is interpreting it as meaning NEMA 4X for wet and corrosive considerations.
 

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And I do not see that as being unreasonable for that application. The industrial plant I often do work at has required 4x for outside enclosures for years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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Hardworking stiff,

You do some pretty cool jobs. I take it you didn't make your money fighting with the rest of the chumps out there doing regular 'ol electric work, you made it specializing in something nobody else did.

I need to learn a couple of small specialties so I dont spend my days always competing with Tom, ****, and Harry.
 

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The 1st sentence of 555.5 says
What does that mean to you?

Does it mean it has to say in the literature that it is designed to go on a floating dock?

Would a NEMA 3R transformer with stainless steel enclosure be "approved for the intended location"?

I've got a call in to the plans reviewer to discuss it, but I was wondering what y'all thought.

I'd say unless it's designed for a marine environment then no. Eaton makes transformer substations designed with gasketed doors and other provisions to keep the water out. The substations also have panelboards built into them so you can feed them with 480 and get 240 out the other end. A 3R transformer usually just has a rainhood that wouldn't prevent water from entering through the vents. Heres the Eaton link http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&ved=0CD4QFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eaton.com%2Fecm%2Fidcplg%3FIdcService%3DGET_FILE%26allowInterrupt%3D1%26RevisionSelectionMethod%3DLatestReleased%26Rendition%3DPrimary%26dDocName%3DBR00600001E&ei=D0OzUqTrOozuoATGr4LQAw&usg=AFQjCNEFfOosnI74T2odcdvv-z96CYoy9g&bvm=bv.58187178,d.cGU
 

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I think i'm no help Lou, but wonder how the GEC's are made on anything floating...?:001_huh:


~CS~
Seawater electrode. 3/4" stainless ground rod attached to side of the dock sometimes bent if it'll hit the ocean floor. I've also seen a EGC ran separate with the cables to the substations.
Some engineers want a ground rod at each pedestal, which IMO is overkill and can cause residual current between electrodes eating up zincs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think i'm no help Lou, but wonder how the GEC's are made on anything floating...?:001_huh:


~CS~
I've wondered the same thing Steve. I even thought about dropping a grounding strap in the water, but then how long before corrosion ate it up.
 
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