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I have been seeing AC-90 pulled into conduit, usually corline, on different jobs in the Vancouver aria. I assume they were inspected. Personally have never done it but I could see how in some situations it makes sense. Has anyone worked on a job where this was done and inspected? Code seems pretty clear it is not allowed.

Back story is that general contractor was forced to hire another electrician to do the job and he is unhappy with the work. He asked me if it was ok to install BX in a conduite. Before I talk down about another tradesman's work I want to be 100% sure I'm not missing something.

"12-602 (6) Armoured cable with overall jacket shall be permitted for use in a raceway when it is installed in
accordance with Rule 12-902 2).

12-902 Types of insulated conductors and cables

2) Notwithstanding Subrule 1), armoured cables as described in Rule 12-602 6) shall be permitted to
be installed in a conduit or tubing, provided that
a) the installation will not result in a greater fill than that specified in Table 8; and
b) the installation conforms to one of the following conditions:
i) the length of cable pulled into the conduit or tubing does not result in the calculated
maximum pulling tension or the calculated maximum sidewall bearing pressure being
exceeded; or
ii) the run of conduit or tubing between draw-in points does not have more than the
equivalent of two 90° bends with minimum radii of not less than 0.944 m for cable rated
1000 V or less and 1.524 m for cable rated in excess of 1000 V, and is limited to a
maximum of
A) 15 m for a three-conductor copper cable;
B) 45 m for a single-conductor copper cable;
C) 35 m for a three-conductor aluminum cable; or
D) 100 m for a single-conductor aluminum cable."


table 19 clearly states that AC-90 it is not allowed in conduit.

Any thoughts would be most appreciated.


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I' ve run into this on high-rise condos in Vancouver.

The argument is the PVC is being used as sleeve or chase (no connectors at either end of pvc.)

The other one is transitioning from AC to PVC or cor-line. This would constitute a FA on the conduit, a metallic connector, and an anti-short taped into the cut end of the armour. We might strip back as much as 10' or so.

Right or wrong, it was acceptable to the AHJ at the time (2003-2005ish).
 

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If the AC goes the entire length of the PVC and there's no other conductors inside it, i can see how an AHJ could consider accepting it. Table19 is pretty clear though, so i'd suspect this wouldn't be accepted much anymore.

... That's just odd though. If i was ok'ing or trying to do something like this i'd probably put a support strap right at the entrance, otherwise you'd be able to pull the entire length out to the other end.
 

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I' ve run into this on high-rise condos in Vancouver.

The argument is the PVC is being used as sleeve or chase (no connectors at either end of pvc.)

The other one is transitioning from AC to PVC or cor-line. This would constitute a FA on the conduit, a metallic connector, and an anti-short taped into the cut end of the armour. We might strip back as much as 10' or so.

Right or wrong, it was acceptable to the AHJ at the time (2003-2005ish).
I remember doing both these things in downtown Vancouver in the 90s. taping the antishort in always seemed kind of hokey.
 

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In PVC I've only transitioned to Teck90 using an FA.

In EMT/Rigid over only done it with a connector on the cable and an approved method of converting to the conduit.

As a sleeve, I haven't done it. Provided the cable is unbroken from end to end I don't see any issues with it.

Although as a sleeve it screams HACK
 
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