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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am working on a trouble shooting device that will monitor for the absence or presence of voltage in control circuits. The input of the device is a rely that is held in by the circuit under test. That could be 120 volts 24 volts or what ever voltage. You just change the relay to the appropriate voltage. The input relay is a double pole relay one pole will have various voltage and the other pole will 120 volts the operating voltage of the trouble shooting device. The questions is,is it acceptable design to have low and high on opposite POLES of the same ice cube relay.
Thanks LC
 

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I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
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I am working on a trouble shooting device that will monitor for the absence or presence of voltage in control circuits. The input of the device is a rely that is held in by the circuit under test. That could be 120 volts 24 volts or what ever voltage. You just change the relay to the appropriate voltage. The input relay is a double pole relay one pole will have various voltage and the other pole will 120 volts the operating voltage of the trouble shooting device. The questions is,is it acceptable design to have low and high on opposite POLES of the same ice cube relay.
Thanks LC

Slightly confused by opposite poles, but yes it is ok to have varying voltages on a relay device, or in english- different coil voltage from the load controlled. There are voltage limits on the device, usually 250 volts max, and also AC/ DC limitations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Could be 24 on one pole 120 on the other pole and a 120 on the coil.
 

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I'm hardly a low voltage electrician.

First, where's the road map to go by?

I can only relate to your situation in the simpliest of principles, the A/C.
An A/C will have low voltage on one side, that pull in the contacts to let
240 run across the contacts.

I can't think where x voltage is on one side and 120V is on a second pole sitting
on the same side!

I guess it could happen, but I thought that ice cubes only went up to 48V.

But In fact I'm bumping the keyboard here... :001_huh:
 

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motors and controls.........
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I've used tons of two pole relays that had 120 on one pole and 24 on the other.

Usually the 120 is a start-stop, and the relay pole is the latch, and the 24 is a PLC input.
 

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We used to do it all the time until we switched to all 24VDC controls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for everyone's reply. I thought that I could but I just was not sure. LC
 
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