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Discussion Starter #1
Something I've never done, wondering what the best way to do this is in Manitoba:
Customer wants to add a new panel to a tarp shed(30x60) about 40ft from the hydro pole that has all his overhead feeds to other buildings. I have nothing to build a mast off of, and its an area he drives sprayers and other equipment thru, so I want to feed it underground from the shed to the pole with ACWU, and run up the side of the pole to the top, but how do I transition out of the armour? Wet Connector-coupler<>emt wet connector<>short length of emt<>service head?

Thought about just sliding a conduit with service head over the end of the ACWU, but that doesn't seem right with the cable just floating inside with no bushings of any kind on the cable.

I have also seen pictures of a heatshrink boot that has individual holes per conductor out the top, so that maybe would be an option.

Thanks
 

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I would use PVC. Wet connector on the ACWU, thread a PVC FA onto that, glue a short piece of conduit into the FA and glue a service head into that.
 

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Elechicken!
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I think @Navyguy has done the heat shrink option.
 

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Estwing magic
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The conductors in ACWU aren’t S rated for sunlight. You need to transition to your riser with a JB and use a Teck connector on the ACWU.

Overhead you need to carry a ground so you need quadraplex if it’s 240V.
 

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Elechicken!
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The conductors in ACWU aren’t S rated for sunlight. You need to transition to your riser with a JB and use a Teck connector on the ACWU.
That's something I never noticed before. (I always check to make sure wire is rated for sunlight on a service, I just have yet to do a service with ACWU or TECK90 to a POA).

In that case, TECK all the way, or at least I would to avoid a junction box...
 

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Elechicken!
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mare the conductors in Teck S rated


Are the conductors in Teck S rated?
I know the conductors in teck from General Cable are. Heres proof.
151635
 

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Yes, I have done the heat shrink a number of times. Usually on temporary services or in a commercial / industrial setting where there was not a good option for an alternative.





Cheers
John
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks @Navyguy for sharing the pictures!

The description says the overall jacket and inner jacket are sunlight-resistant PVC... but what about the XLPE conductor insulation?
Im with u2slow on this, the outer jacket of teck is sunlight rated, not so convinced about the inner.


The conductors in ACWU aren’t S rated for sunlight. You need to transition to your riser with a JB and use a Teck connector on the ACWU.

Overhead you need to carry a ground so you need quadraplex if it’s 240V.
Oh I really don't want to have to put a JB up on that pole! I think I have to disagree with you about the sunlight rating on the ACWU. I buried a length of #4 last week, and the conductor insulation itself was labeled SUN RES. That is why I'm considering it for this job. I also don't need a ground up there, the power on that pole is direct from the next pole over which is the transformer and ring CT's. 240V single phase. I will ground plate the panel at the shed.
 

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I'm certain the construct of a metallic weatherhead on Teck or ACWU was discussed at length in tradeschool. Even so far as lugging the bond wire onto one of the set screws.

I have to check again, but I believe a buddy's 30yo home has exactly that too.
 

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I know the conductors in teck from General Cable are. Heres proof.
I've run ACWU up the pole and never been called on doing so.
Just put a service head directly on the cable.
 

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The conductors in ACWU aren’t S rated for sunlight. You need to transition to your riser with a JB and use a Teck connector on the ACWU.

Overhead you need to carry a ground so you need quadraplex if it’s 240V.
You must have known when you make a blanket statement such as this that someone would throw it back in your face.:)
 

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You must have known when you make a blanket statement such as this that someone would throw it back in your face.:)
I asked my sales rep about this (Texcan) and he said its hit or miss by manufacturer and gauge whether or not the inside insulation is sunlight rated.
 

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I asked my sales rep about this (Texcan) and he said its hit or miss by manufacturer and gauge whether or not the inside insulation is sunlight rated.
That goes for any wire. I buy single conductor RW90 XLPE wire for conduit. Its only sunlight resistant if its larger than #6. It's likely the same for Teck90 and ACWU.
 

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That goes for any wire. I buy single conductor RW90 XLPE wire for conduit. Its only sunlight resistant if its larger than #6. It's likely the same for Teck90 and ACWU.
Your #6 size made me go check my email again:

That’s where I had the same issue – for the most part, XLPE RW90 are not sunlight resistant, but in the larger gauge sizes (#2 and up), different manufacturers will make those as sunlight resistant

There’s no hard and fast rule, and there’s no standardization for that particular requirement amongst the manufacturers

In the vast majority, they are not sunlight resistant, but once in a while they will be

I wish I could provide a clear yes or no, but because most are not, it’s easier to go with a no to be on the safe side
 

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That goes for any wire. I buy single conductor RW90 XLPE wire for conduit. Its only sunlight resistant if its larger than #6. It's likely the same for Teck90 and ACWU.
I don't know what manufacturing processes or costs go into making sunlight resistant wire, it probably has to do with the likelihood of wire smaller than #6 being installed where it is exposed to sunlight. Code allows for service conductors as small as 10cu/8Al but that's a fairly rare thing even if the utility will accept it. Other than that, I'm having a tough time thinking of where you might need sun res smaller than #6.
 

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I don't know what manufacturing processes or costs go into making sunlight resistant wire, it probably has to do with the likelihood of wire smaller than #6 being installed where it is exposed to sunlight. Code allows for service conductors as small as 10cu/8Al but that's a fairly rare thing even if the utility will accept it. Other than that, I'm having a tough time thinking of where you might need sun res smaller than #6.
Billboards are the few rare instances where you may install a 30 amp service, but with the billboard companies leaning more towards tv based displays they need more that 30 amps anyway now and days.
 

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Billboards are the few rare instances where you may install a 30 amp service, but with the billboard companies leaning more towards tv based displays they need more that 30 amps anyway now and days.
I used to install 120 volt/15 amp services for phone booths. Used 3/4” PVC and #10 wire. The utility tied it without a meter directly to overhead lines (or underground), charged the phone company a flat rate.

Yes, I’m that old😐

ETA, @Kevin_Essiambre that was with a company that you also worked for in the past
 
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