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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I kindly request the assistance of the community.

I am taking the Alberta first year test in 2 weeks. I would like to buy the modules if anyone has them, store said it will take a month to get them. At the very least can someone tell me what will be on the test.

How much do i need to know about motors? Types? characteristics? Controls?

What parts of the code book will i need to know? Sizing fuses?

Are there safety questions?

I will pay to copy you modules if you can not part with them. I need to know whats on the test. I am less concerned about math/ohm's law. Anything specific to watch out for? I am trying to study. It has been many years since i did electrician schooling and im not sure where to put my efforts.

Thank You in advance for the help.
 

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RIP 1959-2015
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Hello,

I kindly request the assistance of the community.

I am taking the Alberta first year test in 2 weeks. I would like to buy the modules if anyone has them, store said it will take a month to get them. At the very least can someone tell me what will be on the test.

How much do i need to know about motors? Types? characteristics? Controls?

What parts of the code book will i need to know? Sizing fuses?

Are there safety questions?

I will pay to copy you modules if you can not part with them. I need to know whats on the test. I am less concerned about math/ohm's law. Anything specific to watch out for? I am trying to study. It has been many years since i did electrician schooling and im not sure where to put my efforts.

Thank You in advance for the help.
Good luck on the test.:thumbsup:
 

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Estwing magic
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Contact the NAIT or SAIT bookstore. Maybe this will help:

onlinestore.nait.ca/eSolution/item_detail.php?item=LM0301R3&data=electrician

First year you don't study motors or size fuses.

Seriously though, dude, why would you book an exam when you don't even know what to study for? Your questions tell me that you don't have any idea of what to expect. Good electricians know how to plan in advance. Maybe that's the first thing you should learn.

Passing an exam doesn't make you a good tradesman. An exam is simply an attempt by educators to determine if you know your stuff. It doesn't replace the learning process.

Take a breather, cancel the exam and do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thank you for the reply. I have 16 months of school under my belt. It has been many years since i graduated but I don't think I need to spend another 2 in school to pass this test. I may need to brush up on a few subjects. Or familiarize myself with the current code book. Thank you for the reply. I don't want to spend time brushing up on motor control or programming PLCs etc.. if its not on the test.

First year you don't study motors or size fuses.
This is very helpful. Thank you.
 

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Estwing magic
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I'm sure the resources are there, Carlos. First year is fairly simple - basic DC circuits, basic AC theory, a tour around the code book, maybe a demand calc on a house. Bad time of year to try and get answers. Most of the educators are drinking beer at the lake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've only found very general information. I'm hoping to get examples so I put my time in the right spot. I would have planned ahead if I thought necessary. I wasn't worried until a colleague of mine who completed a different 8 month electrical course informed he did not pass. Now I'm trying to figure out what tripped him up. No reason he should have failed with his education.
 

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Estwing magic
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I don't think you can compare an eight month program to your first year apprentice exam. If you already understand basic circuits and AC theory, that should be easy. You will probably get some apprentices respond to this who can help you with the rest, like code.
 

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List of all the modules I have:

Circuit Fundamentals:
-Basic Mathematics
-Composition of Matter
-Current, Voltage, and Resistance
-Characteristics of Conductors
-Series Resistive Circuits
-Parallel Resistive Circuits
-Series-Parallel Resistive Circuits
-Work, Energy, Power, and Efficiency
-Edison 3 wire Distribution systems

EMF Sources:
-Methods of producing EMF
-Cells and Batteries
-Electromagnetism and Electromagnetic Induction
-Generators

Lab Class:
-Safety
-Meters
-Conductors
-Splicing and Terminating
-Resistors
-Switching Circuits
-Basic Circuits using buzzers and Chimes
-Relays and controls
-Low voltage switching
-Residential Alarm Sytems and Smoke Alarms

Code:
-Intro to Code
-General Rules
-Conductor Material and Sizes
-Service and Grounding Requirments
-Service Feeders and Branch Circuits
-Wiring Methods
-Installation of Electrical Equipment
-Installation of Lighting Equipment
-Lighting
-Data Cabling
-Class I and Class II Circuits
-Orthographic Projections/Diagrams
-Dimensioning and Scaling/Print and Diagram Nomenclature/Construction Drawings
-Print Reading/Applied Drawings

Not to mention all the lab booklets for hands on projects in class...

I'd suggest you put off the test and either work with some people that will walk you through it all, or attend the two months in class. First year is the fundamental for the rest of the years...if you barely pass the test, you're not doing yourself any favours for second year or beyond as the theory and practical stuff gets harder and more complicated. What kind of 8 month program you are taking and from where??? Hell....you only spend 9 months in classes total over the entire apprenticeship (unless you fail or want to take extra stuff).

And yes...these were all modules from just first year....
 

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Focus alot on your Electric code if its for industrial electrician. Don't have to learn every rule in there but be able to find them and learn the section. What i found prety important was learning prety good all table how to use them to calculate and also the annexe. some question won't be in the book but you should have learned them by experience. Also i dunno why but in the Code 2007 when i pass the test the page #434 is prety damn important that show you where to calculate all your motor protection and where to find all article in 1 page and you got a exemple for the first time.

Good luck !
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What kind of 8 month program you are taking and from where???
My colleague took a 8 month electrical program on east coast and did not pass 1st year.
I took a 16 month electrical engineering industrial program in Ontario at Cambrian college. It was many years ago and a different code book so I want to brush up on a few subjects.

My colleague didn't pass and the last 8 months of my program was building lots of electronics, programming PLCs, instrumentation, phase shift calculations. So it won't help much on the first year test.

I wouldn't even be worried if my colleague hadn't had trouble. Only 1/3rd of my program actually graduated with a diploma. I was one of them so my face will be extremely red if I fail the first year test.

Thank you for the reply. That gives me a good idea of what part of the codebook to study.
 

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The test changed alot over the year when i talk with other older journeyman before it was alot more focused on big calculation and learning alot oof theory now we see alot more of searching is the code and learning how to do the thing right.
 

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None of those are on the exam.
It's very basic. If you do not realize it's an early exit course. I know of people who finished first year in 2 weeks and wrote the branch.
But basically it's all those modules stated above. They go into depth on each subject but the branch is only 100 questions, which you need 68% to pass. And it's basic stuff like....know that their called water pump pliers and not channel locks...lol.

And know E = IxR and you'll be fine.
 

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Da f*** you talking about! Are you serious? I didn't know that. I didnt learn that anytime during my 2 years in electrical engineering or in the field.
Lol. I'm dead serious.
When was the last time you seen an engineer pick up a tool? Why would you need to learn it.
But yes, silly basic questions like that are on it. You should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just completed the test. A pass no problem, but there is some weird stuff on there.
1 Example.

What is the most abundant state of matter in the universe.

A solid
B liquid
C gas
D plasma

I guessed gas :(. I'd recommend getting the modules for everyone. There was even weirder questions.
 

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Contact the apprenticeship and occupational certification board for Alberta and they should be able to give you a syllabus or at least a breakdown of the topics covered. On the east coast the 1st year exam breakdown was: safety -3q, tools and equip -3q, access equip -4q, hoisting lifting & rigging -4q, intro to communication and trade documents -5q, drwgs schematics and specs -8q, intro to CEC -17q, intro to computer use -2q, DC theory -8q, DC circuits -5q, conductors and cables -10q, grounding and bonding -7q, conduit tubing and fittings -6q, raceways wireways and busways -4q, fundamental wiring -10q, lighting systems -4q.
I would focus on learning how to find your way through the code, with a 2 year tech program you should already have the basics as far as the theory goes. I completed a 10 month pre-apprenticeship elec program where we spent a lot of time on the code and I found that the 1st year test was a breeze.

Good luck
 
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