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Ok, so I know most people don't care when the lights dim when high draw appliances kick on, but I do. I'm wondering if I can get this worked out by installing capacitor on high draw circuits. I only have a 100amp single phase service, which is more than enough for my little ranch style 1300ft2 house. I just want to get this thing into perfect shape and need never touch wires in it in my lifetime. So... What do you guys think? Are capacitors the answer....

More info, it's 100amp Square D 32 space panel running 30 circuits. Load test on house was 81.2 amps when I had every stinking electrical device I own on and running constant, so I'm not over board, except for inrush when motors kick start. I'm hooked to meter with 1/0 thwn and every lug and screw is torqued to spec... Yes I was on anal run, but hey annual torquing keeps the fire away. Every circuit is correctly sized if no oversized on all major appliances I.e. Stove, AC, Compressor, disposal, dryer, washer, etc.
 

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I think adding capacitors to a residence is not how you make it 'right' or make it so you don't have to touch it again.

Most likely the voltage drop is in the service conductors or the power company transformer.
 

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A capacitor is a storage device for DC current, not AC. A capacitor is not your answer.

A voltage dip is a direct relationship to current and wire resistance. It may be too small a transformer on the street, too small of drop wire, high resistance connection, too small wire to the high load appliance, or a combination of these and other influences.
 

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Like RFGuy says, if you've done everything INSIDE the house to resolve the issue.. it's probably occurring because of something OUTSIDE of the house.

I hate lights dimming too.. but I've come to accept it for most customers. lol It's a gremlin I do not want to chase anymore.
 

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Ok, so I know most people don't care when the lights dim when high draw appliances kick on, but I do. I'm wondering if I can get this worked out by installing capacitor on high draw circuits. I only have a 100amp single phase service, which is more than enough for my little ranch style 1300ft2 house. I just want to get this thing into perfect shape and need never touch wires in it in my lifetime. So... What do you guys think? Are capacitors the answer....

More info, it's 100amp Square D 32 space panel running 30 circuits. Load test on house was 81.2 amps when I had every stinking electrical device I own on and running constant, so I'm not over board, except for inrush when motors kick start. I'm hooked to meter with 1/0 thwn and every lug and screw is torqued to spec... Yes I was on anal run, but hey annual torquing keeps the fire away. Every circuit is correctly sized if no oversized on all major appliances I.e. Stove, AC, Compressor, disposal, dryer, washer, etc.
70 microfarad cap across phases. Be careful. Just a thought.
 

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Re torquing terminals causes more problems than it solves. A properly torqued terminal stretches the threads using the elastic properties of metals, much like a spring, to hold pressure on the wire. Retorquing the threads will push the metal beyond the point it properly returns to its orignal shape.
 

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Look into the utility my lights were flicking for about a month I thought a ghost moved in.. Then one day I lost half power transformer on pole was shot....
 

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I ran into this problem at a farm house. Turned out to be a "good ol' boy" electrician had placed nearly half the homes neutrals on the ground bar on one side of panel, and the neutral bar on the otherside was not bonded to the can. Being without a proper bond screw I simple used #6 bare to connect the bonded ground bar to the neutral bar (100 amp service).
Solved, not only the light dimming problem but also a tingling sensation from the running water. Crazy thing is they put up with this for nearly 30 years! A remodeler friend of mine noticed the problem and suggested they call me.

Check the Grounding!
 

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I ran into this problem at a farm house. Turned out to be a "good ol' boy" electrician had placed nearly half the homes neutrals on the ground bar on one side of panel, and the neutral bar on the otherside was not bonded to the can. Being without a proper bond screw I simple used #6 bare to connect the bonded ground bar to the neutral bar (100 amp service).
Solved, not only the light dimming problem but also a tingling sensation from the running water. Crazy thing is they put up with this for nearly 30 years! A remodeler friend of mine noticed the problem and suggested they call me.

Check the Grounding!


You undersized the #6. Since you have neutrals on both bars, you would have needed a #4.
 

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Ah, yes you are right. My thought process was flawed. I thought merely of bonding the neutral bar and not of making the ground bar a neutral bar. Good thing the customer was so enamored with my skills that they asked for a complete service upgrade. Therefore the entire mess was redone. So my conscience is clear!

Thank you for your input.
 
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