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Dirty rotten bastards.
Like many states, Florida homeowners are reimbursed at roughly the same rate power companies charge their customers, usually in the form of a credit on their monthly bill. Sen. Jennifer Bradley, a Republican who represents parts of north Florida, has introduced legislation that could cut that rate by about 75% and open the door to electric companies charging solar customers monthly minimum fees.
Bradley contended that the existing rate structure, created in 2008, was intended to help jump-start rooftop solar in Florida. She told a Senate committee that non-solar homes are now subsidizing an industry that is "mature, with many competitors, large publicly traded companies, and substantially reduced prices."
Despite its recent growth, solar's foothold in Florida lags behind many states. About 90,000 households are solar-powered, which is 1% of all electric customers in the state. Florida ranks 21st in the country in solar residential systems per capita, according to an industry analysis from the Solar Energy Industries Association, the national trade organization for solar energy builders. In comparison, California -- where regulators are also considering utility-backed changes to its net-metering policy -- has 1.3 million customers fitted with solar panels.
Advocates of rooftop solar in Florida see a familiar foe behind the legislation: Florida Power & Light, the state's largest electric utility and one of the most prolific political donors in the state.
A draft version of the bill Bradley introduced was delivered to her by a Florida Power & Light lobbyist on October 18, according to emails first reported by the Miami Herald and provided to CNN by the Energy and Policy Institute, a watchdog organization that targets fossil fuel and utility interests.
Two days later, Florida Power & Light's parent company, NextEra Energy, made a $10,000 donation to Women Building the Future, a political committee affiliated with Bradley, according to state campaign finance records. The committee received another $10,000 contribution from NextEra in December, those records show.

And our POS Governor DeSantis
Ahead of this year's legislative fight, Florida Power & Light and NextEra donated $3 million to political campaigns and committees. They have given to both parties, but mostly to Republicans and GOP-aligned groups. Republicans have majority control of the Florida House and Senate. The bill passed a Senate committee earlier this month on a 6-2 vote.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, who ran on a promise to "drain the Tallahassee swamp" of special interests, has not publicly taken a side. DeSantis spokeswoman Christina Pushaw said the governor was aware of the net-metering legislation but did not have a comment. Florida Power & Light and NextEra have donated a combined $42,000 to DeSantis since he took office, including a $12,000 donation in December, according to state campaign finance records.
"Like all legislation, we will be monitoring them as they move through the process," Pushaw said.
Chris McGrath, a spokesman for Florida Power & Light, acknowledged the company has worked with lawmakers on the legislation, but declined to discuss specifics about the company's political donations. NextEra Energy did not respond to a request for comment.
 

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I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
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One of my siblings makes his living selling pv systems to homeowners. He has the gift of chicanery and art of selling.
He's gonna be bummed out by this. Back to Aluminum Siding Contractor I guess.....................
 

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Gee, did the OP really have to squeeze in the political bent ? Let's switch this to hospitals and talk about how come there are so many vacancy's in staffing in them across the entire country and who we can blame that upon...........
 

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Gee, did the OP really have to squeeze in the political bent ? Let's switch this to hospitals and talk about how come there are so many vacancy's in staffing in them across the entire country and who we can blame that upon...........
Is it really a political bent when the lawmaker is handed a draft by the company that has an interest in legislation going their way? The whole thing is political. The convenient donations are just the icing on the cake.
 

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Would it then be the assumption of folks in other states that CA major utilities don't donate to the political faction in power? Organized labor?

Is the political supermajority & organized labor lobbying in favor of individually owned renewables/storage?
 

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Would it then be the assumption of folks in other states that CA major utilities don't donate to the political faction in power? Organized labor?

Is the political supermajority & organized labor lobbying in favor of individually owned renewables/storage?
A regulated utility (because they have no competition) shouldn't have any disposable income to donate to political causes. If they want to use their guaranteed profits (which should not be guaranteed, that's the antithesis of a private company owning and operating a public utility.) that's considered free speech. But what every munici[pality should do is consider installing and operating their own underground grid and sell at cost and 0 profit with an all volunteer board, electricity purchased wholesale from their respective grids and see if FPL and the likes of PSE&G can actually compete due to their superior management techniques...

Every electric co-op upstate NY (I'm in one) has their rate at 1/3 what the surrunding PSE&G rates are so.... Methinks the gpvernment really needs to just give these private corporations the heave-ho and just nationalize the entire electric grid. Water, sewer and gas too while they're at it.... Oh and telecommunications, internet and cable TV service as well.
 

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I never understood the retail price HOs got for PV production. But I don’t believe solar is the answer to our future energy needs either. Off grid is a different story. ROI with tax credits, rebates, and retail pricing schemes is still double digit in years. As it stands today, I don’t believe PV is a viable alternative to the Grid.
 

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I wonder how a nationalized grid would work relative to the liabilities involved with loss of life & property?
What liabilities would a nationalized grid face as aopposed to the grid as it stands now?
This is infuriating. There is a lot of benefit to solar.
Sure is. My home upstate when electric heat is not running and I burn wood or pellets or kerosene for heat and hot water, uses less than 120 amps at 1120 volts. I ran it for 9 says off a small inverter Generac 2500 watt and it used one gallon every 18 hours. (Off for 6 per 24) If I had a Telsa Powerwall and solar... I could go off grid. m
I never understood the retail price HOs got for PV production. But I don’t believe solar is the answer to our future energy needs either. Off grid is a different story. ROI with tax credits, rebates, and retail pricing schemes is still double digit in years. As it stands today, I don’t believe PV is a viable alternative to the Grid.
One thing the municipalities should look into is remotely locating the solar panels people want to install and instead use them to cover the railroad tracks and interstate highways so they all become rain and snow resistant and therefore more dependable, and the ugly panels are all instead used as roofing.
 

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I make all the electrons line up for their Flu shots
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I have watched 4 telephone companies crash and burn here now. I think ours is trying desperate to find a buyer. Not all is due to wireless phones. The killer is really the constant push to bury the lines in the ground. Hawaiian Electric Company no longer allows the phone company to share space on the overhead lines. Hawaiian tel's poles are all termite eaten up. I see lots just hanging on the wires, the pole doesn't touch the ground any more. And new lines have to be underground thanks to ( my gosh, I'm gonna sound like MTW saying it) the commies.........
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Gee, did the OP really have to squeeze in the political bent ? Let's switch this to hospitals and talk about how come there are so many vacancy's in staffing in them across the entire country and who we can blame that upon...........
I really did when I read that all they had to contribute was about $50k to destroy an entire industry.
 

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Hackenschmidt
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I really did when I read that all they had to contribute was about $50k to destroy an entire industry.
Dirty rotten bastards.
Despite its recent growth, solar's foothold in Florida lags behind many states. About 90,000 households are solar-powered
Well the solution is easy, every solar household could chip in $0.60 - that would be $54,000 - and buy back their legislators.
 

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Is it fair that a solar generator is reimbursed at the same rate the power company sells to the consumer? I think not.

You want power at night, on cloudy days, etc. So, the power company has to maintain generation capability for when the solar producers don't produce. There is a cost to that w/out revenue when solar is working, who should pay for it?

The cost for maintaining the distribution system is not being charged to the solar generator even though they get to sell their excess power into the distribution system and reimbursed at the same rate? Not fair at all (to the power company).

I think it is completely fair to charge a fee for usage and a separate fee for delivery. Home solar will lose the subsidy and people will find out that home solar is expensive if it competes w/out subsidies.

IMO this is a complex problem and does not have simple solutions. Someone is going to get screwed.
 

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Hackenschmidt
Joined
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13,248 Posts
Is it fair that a solar generator is reimbursed at the same rate the power company sells to the consumer? I think not.

You want power at night, on cloudy days, etc. So, the power company has to maintain generation capability for when the solar producers don't produce. There is a cost to that w/out revenue when solar is working, who should pay for it?

The cost for maintaining the distribution system is not being charged to the solar generator even though they get to sell their excess power into the distribution system and reimbursed at the same rate? Not fair at all (to the power company).

I think it is completely fair to charge a fee for usage and a separate fee for delivery. Home solar will lose the subsidy and people will find out that home solar is expensive if it competes w/out subsidies.

IMO this is a complex problem and does not have simple solutions. Someone is going to get screwed.
This is exactly right. You can't bring water to the water company and demand that they take it at the same rate they sell it to you.

In the clipping they referred to California as an example. If there's one thing we've learned about energy from California, it's "Don't do what California does!"
 
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