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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently do oilfield automation in Colorado. The Co that I work for has an employee with a CO masters license that we work under here, even though the work that I personally do does not get inspected.

The owner of my Co has asked me if I would be willing to get my masters in WY so that the Co could do some work up there. What kind of work I'm not sure yet, but I know that WY is a lot more strict on their permitting than CO is. I am already approved to take the exam, I have just been putting it off.

The job that I do here in CO (sub-contracted out to a large energy producer) would not allow me to go up to WY to supervise or check on the work being done. Nor do I want to. What kind of liability would I be open to with this set up? Would all of the liability be taken by the holder of the actual contractors license and insurance policies?
 

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re-read your question, doesn't it sound sketchy. Are you going to be inspecting the work personally?? If not I would pass. It's really just something I wouldn't recommend, maybe it was a close friend of yours and your SURE of his work. But to each his own, risk over reward.
 

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Sorry I didn't fully answer your question. WHOEVER has the license on the PERMIT, their insurance is who is going to bat for whatever, god forbid, happens. Your going to be the one getting the call. I don't understand how they have enough guys in WY to successfully complete work they may generate, but cannot find anyone with a license and insurance closer to their. Don't be someone's pawn, think about what he's telling you. People try funny things.
 

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Now you are caught between a rock and a hard place. You're employer should not know you have a Masters Lic.

I have been asked 100's of times since 1975. I've refused 100's of times. Any problems yo take the hit. You will have NO friends when you are standing in front of the Judge.
 

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Lots of guys take test in other jurisdictions for their employers. The employer pays their fees and carries the liability insurance for that person. Any permit he pulled with his license is in the name of the company. They are in the hook for the liability.
 

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Only possible problem is you are an agent of the employer as far as the city is concerned. You cannot pull a permit for yourself on your own job because they will be the contractor on file. No more side jobs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Only possible problem is you are an agent of the employer as far as the city is concerned. You cannot pull a permit for yourself on your own job because they will be the contractor on file. No more side jobs.
I work 60 hrs. a week so I don't have the time or inclination to do side jobs anyway. I'm meeting with the owner tomorrow to see exactly what he is wanting to do.

I do agree that if he is going to be hiring people in WY, he should just find a WY master. It's worth looking into, and I will get any agreement in writing.
 

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zoltan said:
I work 60 hrs. a week so I don't have the time or inclination to do side jobs anyway. I'm meeting with the owner tomorrow to see exactly what he is wanting to do. I do agree that if he is going to be hiring people in WY, he should just find a WY master. It's worth looking into, and I will get any agreement in writing.
Check your PM
 

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I currently do oilfield automation in Colorado. The Co that I work for has an employee with a CO masters license that we work under here, even though the work that I personally do does not get inspected.

The owner of my Co has asked me if I would be willing to get my masters in WY so that the Co could do some work up there. What kind of work I'm not sure yet, but I know that WY is a lot more strict on their permitting than CO is. I am already approved to take the exam, I have just been putting it off.

The job that I do here in CO (sub-contracted out to a large energy producer) would not allow me to go up to WY to supervise or check on the work being done. Nor do I want to. What kind of liability would I be open to with this set up? Would all of the liability be taken by the holder of the actual contractors license and insurance policies?
Go out in the back yard and shoot yourself in the foot. If you don't come up with an answer after that, do it again.
Let us know what you decided.
 

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I currently do oilfield automation in Colorado. The Co that I work for has an employee with a CO masters license that we work under here, even though the work that I personally do does not get inspected.

The owner of my Co has asked me if I would be willing to get my masters in WY so that the Co could do some work up there. What kind of work I'm not sure yet, but I know that WY is a lot more strict on their permitting than CO is. I am already approved to take the exam, I have just been putting it off.

The job that I do here in CO (sub-contracted out to a large energy producer) would not allow me to go up to WY to supervise or check on the work being done. Nor do I want to. What kind of liability would I be open to with this set up? Would all of the liability be taken by the holder of the actual contractors license and insurance policies?
If you cannot go there from time to time then do not do it, it is your license that will get pulled if they are cheating the system in WY, if that license gets revoked in WY the electricians board in CO, May turn around and do the same, using whatever misconduct that WY used to revoke your master license there.
 

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Go for it. Make him pay for it, and pay you well for earning, and maintaining that license. If you don't live there, and don't go there, who cares. Make him hold the contractors license and liability insurance. If him or his guys in that state mess up and get your license revoked, so what. Having that license will be your ticket to a good raise, and will make you worth more to your employer. All the legal stuff can be worked out. Make that money
 

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If you cannot go there from time to time then do not do it, it is your license that will get pulled if they are cheating the system in WY, if that license gets revoked in WY the electricians board in CO, May turn around and do the same, using whatever misconduct that WY used to revoke your master license there.
I don't know what the requirements in WY are, but as quoted, most licenses demand that the master supervise the work, so it is a given that you will personally have to be involved in supervising the work, with boots on the ground at some point(s). But as others said, go for it.
 

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From Wyoming State Statues & Rules & Regulations

"Master electrician of record" means a Wyoming licensed Master electrician who is actively employed by a licensed electrical contractor in a full-time capacity, and who assumes responsibility to ensure the National Electrical Code, w.s. 35-9-120 through 35-9-130 and applicable rules of the Department of Fire Prevention and Electrical Safety are adhered to on all electrical work undertaken by the electrical contractor in the state of Wyoming, and who is not the master electrician of State record for or employed by, any other electrical contractor.
In addition to that, when we renew our license, we have to sign a form saying something to the effect that we materially participate in the work. We have to get that notarized before we send it in.
Looks like the master of record would be held at least partially responsible if every thing goes to hell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I had seen that too. I also came across this:

(a) Licensed electrical contractors employing licensed master or journeymen electricians, or registered apprentice electricians supervised by a licensed master or journeyman electrician shall install all electrical equipment. This requirement is waived for the following, however the waiver does not exempt the following persons from meeting all other code requirements under this act:



(ii) Oil or gas field operations, including those operations involving exploration, testing, drilling, production or transporting via pipeline of oil or gas, railroads, petroleum refineries, fertilizer manufacturing facilities, foundries, mines and their appurtenant facilities;

I'm not exactly sure what kind of work he's hoping to get up there but we are an oilfield service company, so I would think that most of it would fall under that exception.
 

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zoltan said:
I had seen that too. I also came across this: (a) Licensed electrical contractors employing licensed master or journeymen electricians, or registered apprentice electricians supervised by a licensed master or journeyman electrician shall install all electrical equipment. This requirement is waived for the following, however the waiver does not exempt the following persons from meeting all other code requirements under this act: (ii) Oil or gas field operations, including those operations involving exploration, testing, drilling, production or transporting via pipeline of oil or gas, railroads, petroleum refineries, fertilizer manufacturing facilities, foundries, mines and their appurtenant facilities; I'm not exactly sure what kind of work he's hoping to get up there but we are an oilfield service company, so I would think that most of it would fall under that exception.
Exactly. You won't be pulling permits with the township to replace services and having to get inspections so who cares. Go for it. Than after a year or so hopefully that work is going good and making your boss a lot of money and you could try and get "piece of the pie".
 

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I don't know what the requirements in WY are, but as quoted, most licenses demand that the master supervise the work, so it is a given that you will personally have to be involved in supervising the work, with boots on the ground at some point(s). But as others said, go for it.
Whose license should a contractor use to pull permits if not one of the employees? Who else is left? Sure, a small shop will have the owner as the license holder and he will be wearing tools. What about shops with 100+ guys who do work in multiple jurisdictions? The owner is not going to have time to pop in on his way to Fiji to inspect a resi service upgrade. In Indy there are many 100+ shops and I know the license holders don't (and can't) inspect all installs.
 

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I had seen that too. I also came across this:

(a) Licensed electrical contractors employing licensed master or journeymen electricians, or registered apprentice electricians supervised by a licensed master or journeyman electrician shall install all electrical equipment. This requirement is waived for the following, however the waiver does not exempt the following persons from meeting all other code requirements under this act:



(ii) Oil or gas field operations, including those operations involving exploration, testing, drilling, production or transporting via pipeline of oil or gas, railroads, petroleum refineries, fertilizer manufacturing facilities, foundries, mines and their appurtenant facilities;

I'm not exactly sure what kind of work he's hoping to get up there but we are an oilfield service company, so I would think that most of it would fall under that exception.
i did not know that>
 
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