Electrician Talk banner
1 - 20 of 68 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why are there two holes in the line side of a GFI? When would the second set be used? I can see two sets of holes on the load side, but I don't understand why that would be on the line side.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
I own stock in FotoMat!
Joined
·
39,115 Posts
Why are there two holes in the line side of a GFI? When would the second set be used? I can see two sets of holes on the load side, but I don't understand why that would be on the line side.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Same reason there's two sets of holes in a standard receptacle.

Sent from MyOuthouse using ToiletPaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
We had a customer who had all his outside outlets on the same circuit. He wanted them all to be GFI protected, but he didn't want them to all trip if one did. So we installed all GFI outlets and line loaded them so if one tripped, all wouldn't.
 

·
I own stock in FotoMat!
Joined
·
39,115 Posts
We had a customer who had all his outside outlets on the same circuit. He wanted them all to be GFI protected, but he didn't want them to all trip if one did. So we installed all GFI outlets and line loaded them so if one tripped, all wouldn't.
To me, "line-loaded" means you ran power into the line, and back out the load. So all the downstream receps were protected by that GFI.

So if there's a fault in the end of a 5-recep run, any one of the 5 could trip out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
To me, "line-loaded" means you ran power into the line, and back out the load. So all the downstream receps were protected by that GFI.

So if there's a fault in the end of a 5-recep run, any one of the 5 could trip out.
We ran power into the line and back out the line (did not use any of the load terminals) at each of the GFI outlets. The hope was that if one tripped it would trip independently and the other outlets would stay live. Was that correct thinking?
 

·
RIP 1959-2015
Joined
·
39,618 Posts
Why are there two holes in the line side of a GFI? When would the second set be used? I can see two sets of holes on the load side, but I don't understand why that would be on the line side.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
In such a case you can use the receptacle as a feed through to something YOU do not want tripping the GFCI receptacle.

Welcome to the forum..:thumbup:



Sent from my iPhone using swamp-butt.:eek:
 

·
I own stock in FotoMat!
Joined
·
39,115 Posts
We ran power into the line and back out the line (did not use any of the load terminals) at each of the GFI outlets. The hope was that if one tripped it would trip independently and the other outlets would stay live. Was that correct thinking?
I would call that line-in/line-out or line-line.
 

·
IBEW MEMBER
Joined
·
383 Posts
Then if you did line line then you probably put GFCIs in all the locations so they would only trip there and not affect any other outlets .
yeah, there was 8 tables that had these test algae growing ponds. each one had a control box for a paddle motor and temperature probe. the cw went line line and effectively bypassed the point of the gfi switch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,071 Posts
You might also feed the GFCI from a multiwire branch circuit, so that both a gfci & non-gfci circuit share a noodle homerun, or 2 different GFCI circuits. In that case, you could feed out of your 2nd noodle hole with the second circuit to feed something else entirely without having to tail off 3 separate noodles at the homerun location.
 

·
Fluke Skywalker
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
IslandGuy said:
You might also feed the GFCI from a multiwire branch circuit, so that both a gfci & non-gfci circuit share a noodle homerun, or 2 different GFCI circuits. In that case, you could feed out of your 2nd noodle hole with the second circuit to feed something else entirely without having to tail off 3 separate noodles at the homerun location.
Nope
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
IslandGuy said:
You might also feed the GFCI from a multiwire branch circuit, so that both a gfci & non-gfci circuit share a noodle homerun, or 2 different GFCI circuits. In that case, you could feed out of your 2nd noodle hole with the second circuit to feed something else entirely without having to tail off 3 separate noodles at the homerun location.
You been drinking sir?
 

·
I own stock in FotoMat!
Joined
·
39,115 Posts
You might also feed the GFCI from a multiwire branch circuit, so that both a gfci & non-gfci circuit share a noodle homerun, or 2 different GFCI circuits. In that case, you could feed out of your 2nd noodle hole with the second circuit to feed something else entirely without having to tail off 3 separate noodles at the homerun location.
You been drinking sir?
Makes perfect sense. MWBC to box with GFCI recep. Red & white to line side of GFCI recep. Black to the black of a 2-wire going to another circuit, and the white of that NM to the 2nd hole on the neutral side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Makes perfect sense. MWBC to box with GFCI recep. Red & white to line side of GFCI recep. Black to the black of a 2-wire going to another circuit, and the white of that NM to the 2nd hole on the

Your saying bring the black to another circuit? I'm not sure I understand. Another circuit that's already fed from the panel? Or feed another set of receptacles with that black utilizing the nuetral from the MWBC??
 
1 - 20 of 68 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top