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I was wondering if some southern American friends can help me with a question I have wondered about for a while now?

When the US apprentice is trained, does he only acquire certification in a SPECIFIC aspect of the trade, that is, "conduit", "wire pulling", etc......?

Is this the same for all states?
 

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power said:
I was wondering if some southern American friends can help me with a question I have wondered about for a while now? When the US apprentice is trained, does he only acquire certification in a SPECIFIC aspect of the trade, that is, "conduit", "wire pulling", etc......? Is this the same for all states?
Every state is different, but we get trained in all aspects of electrical work.
 

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I was wondering if some southern American friends can help me with a question I have wondered about for a while now?

When the US apprentice is trained, does he only acquire certification in a SPECIFIC aspect of the trade, that is, "conduit", "wire pulling", etc......?

Is this the same for all states?
in California apprentices either train as commercial(8,000 OTJ hours) or residential (4800 hours) after completing the required hours they must test for certification. You cannot acquire certification in a specific area, you need to know it all.
 

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in California apprentices either train as commercial(8,000 OTJ hours) or residential (4800 hours) after completing the required hours they must test for certification. You cannot acquire certification in a specific area, you need to know it all.
There are more breakdowns....You also have Low Voltage guys and Lighting Techs....

Across the board it needs to be more standardized, IMO.
 
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In Oregon (where I'm licensed) there are the following 23 separate electrical licenses; each with there own specific discipline. The major license is the General Journeyman requiring the most training and experience which allows the holder to perform all aspects of the electrical trade. The Supervisor's license is the same as a Master's license in other states. There are tons of rules and laws that cover how to obtain each one and what the limitations are.



Electrical Contractor (C)
Electrical Contractor, Limited Energy (CLE)
Electrical Contractor, Limited Maintenance Specialty (LMS)
Electrical Contractor, Limited Maintenance Specialty HVAC (LHR)
Electrical Contractor, Limited Pump Installation Specialty (CPI)
Electrical Contractor, Limited Sign (CLS)
Electrical Contractor, Renewable Energy, Limited (CLR)
Electrical Contractor, Restricted Energy (CRE)
Electrician, General Journeyman (J)
Electrician, General Journeyman (J) Reciprocal
Electrician, General Supervising (S)
Electrician, General Supervising (S) Reciprocal
Electrician, Limited Building Maintenance (BME)
Electrician, Limited Energy Technician, Class A (LEA)
Electrician, Limited Energy Technician, Class B (LEB)
Electrician, Limited Journeyman, Manufacturing Plant (PJ)
Electrician, Limited Journeyman, Sign (SIG)
Electrician, Limited Journeyman, Stage (ST)
Electrician, Limited Maintenance (LME)
Electrician, Limited Maintenance Manufactured Structures (LMM)
Electrician, Limited Renewable Energy Technician (LRT)
Electrician, Limited Residential (LR)
Electrician, Limited Supervisor, Manufacturing Plant (PS)

But to answer your question: No. You cannot get a license for one part of a discipline. Each license is an entire discipline of it's own to include all tasks and knowledge skills required for that discipline.

P.S. and really? do we have to be SOUTH America? :blink: Can't we at least claim Southern North America??? :laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:
 
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