Electrician Talk banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just recently got my apprenticeship for construction wireman and I know the 6 month raises are based on hours and a certain percentage of wages but I'd like to know exactly how it works if anyone could inform me that'd be great thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Normally 6 months have to pass and you have to have 25 weeks by 40 hours for each week. BOOM! Repeat until your a journeyman. Have your agreement handy? It should lay it out exactly how things work.

Sent from my SM-G900P using electriciantalk.com mobile app
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,020 Posts
Are you in a Union apprenticeship program? If so it may differ local to local.

In ours, apprentices start at 50% of Journeyman wage. Then every 1000 or 1500 hours or so they get bumped up like 10 or 15% incrementally until their final term at 80%.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,328 Posts
Are you in a Union apprenticeship program? If so it may differ local to local.

In ours, apprentices start at 50% of Journeyman wage. Then every 1000 or 1500 hours or so they get bumped up like 10 or 15% incrementally until their final term at 80%.
That's awesome for the apprentice, but horrifying if you are the owner. Don't you also have a ratio of jw's to apprentices? I believe down here it was 1 per.
I just cant see paying a greenie 1/2 the wage of a certified electrician. But I guess it's a great incentive program. i'd sign up.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
13,020 Posts
That's awesome for the apprentice, but horrifying if you are the owner. Don't you also have a ratio of jw's to apprentices? I believe down here it was 1 per.
I just cant see paying a greenie 1/2 the wage of a certified electrician. But I guess it's a great incentive program. i'd sign up.
The owners don't seem to complain. They like early term apprentices because they are comparatively cheap labor. Oregon doesn't have any "trainee" or "helper" bullsh!t; to do electrical work you have to be a Journeyman, Supervisor, or Apprentice. Journeyman have to be under the indirect supervision of a Supervisor, apprentices have to be under the direct supervision of a Journeyman until they reach 6500 hours, at which point they are granted an Indirect Supervision license and can work on their own, but only on short projects (less than 8 hours) and only on systems less than 240 volts or something like that.

The point is, all the contractors in the state are on the same playing field as far as licensing requirements go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,328 Posts
The owners don't seem to complain. They like early term apprentices because they are comparatively cheap labor. Oregon doesn't have any "trainee" or "helper" bullsh!t; to do electrical work you have to be a Journeyman, Supervisor, or Apprentice. Journeyman have to be under the indirect supervision of a Supervisor, apprentices have to be under the direct supervision of a Journeyman until they reach 6500 hours, at which point they are granted an Indirect Supervision license and can work on their own, but only on short projects (less than 8 hours) and only on systems less than 240 volts or something like that.

The point is, all the contractors in the state are on the same playing field as far as licensing requirements go.
That's great.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top