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"Mainstreet"
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I am currently doing a house remodel and I have no experience with arc fault breakers. I am wanting to know if I have bedroom lights tied into a arc fault if I will have issues like I remembor reading about in the past.
Do they have broader tollerences now or will I be kicking myself if I leave it?
BTW Hi everyone!:)
 

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Wireman191 said:
I am currently doing a house remodel and I have no experience with arc fault breakers. I am wanting to know if I have bedroom lights tied into a arc fault if I will have issues like I remembor reading about in the past. Do they have broader tollerences now or will I be kicking myself if I leave it? BTW Hi everyone!:)
What code cycle you on?
 

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"Mainstreet"
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Discussion Starter #5
I just want to know if they will trip when tied to a lighting ckt. As far as I know and last checked we have to use them in bedroom ckts.
 

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You have no choice to AFCI protect bedroom lighting per the 2011 NEC.

210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection.
(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single phase, 15- and
20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets installed in
dwelling unit family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms,
parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation
rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas shall
be protected by a listed arc-fault circuit interrupter,
combination-type, installed to provide protection of the
branch circuit.
Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which current is
taken to supply utilization equipment.
 

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You're required to put it on an arc fault breaker if you add to, or alter the residential lighting circuit. What brand breakers are in there? The newer ones don't seem to have tripping issues if the wiring Is done well (no overly tight staples, rusty exhaust or fan motors).
 

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AFCI's work as advertised now. They were not nearly so when introduced and I think a lot of the earliest claims turned out to be BS marketing.
The current batch of AFCIs work as they are intended, have very few unexplainable trips (i have at least 1 verified smart meter causing trips). If they keep tripping we now always find a wiring error or failure of a part of the circuit so my experience is AFCIs are reliable now.
 

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AFCI's work as advertised now. They were not nearly so when introduced and I think a lot of the earliest claims turned out to be BS marketing.
The current batch of AFCIs work as they are intended, have very few unexplainable trips (i have at least 1 verified smart meter causing trips). If they keep tripping we now always find a wiring error or failure of a part of the circuit so my experience is AFCIs are reliable now.
They are probably just GFCI breakers re branded to keep the $$ flowing.
 

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There can always be issues with afci but installed properly then they generally work well. Now a vacuum, flat screen TV, computers etc can cause issues with them. I have had to call GE and get a different generation afci to replace the one I had issues with. That usually works.
 

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They detect series and parallel arc faults. It's not AFCI/GFCI like I thought when I first read about them.
I don't believe the original AFCI breakers were combination-type, they were branch and feeder protection.

Combination type are branch, feeder, and outlet protection.
 

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I don't believe the original AFCI breakers were combination-type, they were branch and feeder protection.

Combination type are branch, feeder, and outlet protection.
I'm pretty sure "combination" refers to having parallel and series fault protection: Line-ground,Line-neutral, ground-neutral. The newer ones have the arc signature of most common items (TV's, vacuums, switches etc) programed in. Most of them also have ground fault protection also. It is 35 ma so it's not enough to serve as a replacement for locations requiring GFCI protection. This info is from a CH tech that put on a seminar I attended. I wish they would just make the GFCI protection at 4 or 6ma, what ever code specs, so we could just use them everywhere and be done.
On a side note, I think GE has removed the GFCI portion in their latest AFCI's.That's one way to stop nuisance tripping!
 
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