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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I first got into this line of work, most of the guys I worked around had been at the company for 5, 10 even 20 years. This was how it was done. Find a good company and stay there.

Now it seems like 2-3 years is the average for most people. Everyone is always on the move.

Whats it like in your neck of the woods?
 

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Top guys from 34 years on down to 8, with a few new guys.
 

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Electrical Contractor
Trying to retire or at least slow down a bit, but life not cooperating
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I personally always tried mixing up the companies I worked for every few years.
Tried to get into as many different aspects of electrical I could…while also learning different ways of doing the same thing.
 

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Bilge Rat
motors and controls.........
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My average is about 10 years.

The companies usually start out treating me pretty good then, over the years, pretty good becomes more like 'you're just another number'.

I think that some of the rapid turnover is because of throwaway personal relationships these days but a lot of it is employers taking employees for granted and cutting costs at their expense.

Do these people not realize that en employee who can be handed a list of instrumentation for a plant and a month or so later he has built a control panel 7' high and 12' long is not going to notice that he didn't get a bonus this year but the owner of the company got a brand-new pickup truck with nice wide tires and all the bells and whistles?

Believe me, we notice........
 

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Well, both. Since there’s multiple generations. My demographic (genX) and older seem to be the long term employees and the millennials don’t stick around. In general of course. Maybe it’s always been that way. The older generation has found places they like and the younger ones are still looking.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Industrial Mostly, Panels and drives
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I seem to average about 4 years. Usually I come on for a manager in particular, like working for him he gets fired or moves on and I hate the next jackass.

My current job will not likely last 4 months. It is just.....insane. I have never seen a place like it.

I am seriously considering the long haul to trying to run myself. Considering the ups and downs I don't know if its the right course, but I really need to respect the people giving orders even if I don't agree with the orders. I find most management intolerable and tyrannical. Is it so hard not to knee jerk every decision..fu*!#$ co**)ckers
 

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Many of my employees went on to get licenses so I don't blame them one bit. My longest employee stayed 12 years and now owns my business. We had another employee who had been with us 7 years or more but he got his license so I don't know how much longer he will be there.

I agree, in general employees are constantly moving but that is true in many fields. My daughter is making good money but she always wants to move on after 4 years or so... Not always for more money but for new experiences
 
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TL;DR: I've spent an average of 18 months per job pre-electrician, and even less time per job post-electrician.

I started out as a software engineer. I did that job for 23 years. I stayed an average of 18 months at each place I worked. If I got bored, or didn't like the work, or didn't like the manager, or didn't feel like I was doing a good job there, I would send out some résumés. The market for software engineers was hot so I usually got a new job within a month with a large increase in salary. In fact, my salary got so high, that I would get comments from hiring managers like "your salary is much higher than the other candidates, we can only offer you a small increase." I guess they assumed that since I was so highly paid, I must be the best guy to hire. Boy, were they wrong. :D

I discovered that I really didn't like being a software engineer early on. The job was hard because I'm are usually fixing other people's work and that work is usually undocumented spaghetti code. I only really enjoyed the work when I got to design and write a project from scratch which was rare. I looked around for something different to do. I took classes, I did side jobs, I started side businesses. Nothing really worked because I was unwilling to give up all the money I was making as an SE.

I got my "big break" in 2001 when the tech economy crashed. Lots of software shops went out of business, and I had just finished a temp consulting job and was vacationing (which means I was unemployed and not yet looking).

I couldn't get another SE job (since I was older and expensive) and was forced (somewhat willingly) to find something else. I bounced around doing "stupid" jobs for a while but eventually joined the union apprenticeship (at 46). I've now been an electrician 16 years and I love it. Because I was union, I was hired and laid-off frequently, but I've spent relatively little time unemployed. I'd say the average length of job was three months. I did one stint of 2.5 years at a hospital. Six years ago I started an EC company. I haven't been laid-off or fired since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My daughter is making good money but she always wants to move on after 4 years or so... Not always for more money but for new experiences
To be honest, I have done this a little. Always curious to get some experience on something new. But with 40 approaching soon, the allure of constantly searching for something new has started to seem childish.

I guess we all have to grow up sooner or later.
 

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To be honest, I have done this a little. Always curious to get some experience on something new. But with 40 approaching soon, the allure of constantly searching for something new has started to seem childish.

I guess we all have to grow up sooner or later.

My wife has been telling me that for 40 years now
 

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A good pension plan keeps people around... getting far and few between these days. Working class wages are already low (compared to cost of living), and hourly-paid work can be spotty on continuity, so people are quick to change-up for improvements on either front.

4 years was my average maximum until I got a salary job with a decent pension. 13 years in now.
 

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I've been at the same company for 32 years.

Chief cook and bottle washer, that's me.
Joe, your making me feel old now. I had to stop and do the math. 36 Years in the trade and company owner. First ten years with a partner, next 26 divorced from him. I had one corporate job in a test lab after school, and that was enough for me. I loved the work but couldn't stand the corporate politics. My old boss is still a good friend to this day, now half way across the country.

I guess i still enjoy what I do. Had many types of customers over the years, specializing in jobs that nobody else wanted to tackle. All of the work has been word of mouth referrals. Only bought one phone book ad back in the partner days, it proved to be useless for me. No office phone for the last 20 years and never got a web page. Treating the customers right and looking out for their best interest has always worked well for me.

Been through a few boom and bust economic cycles, but learned that that can be a good thing, a time to refocus on what you want to pursue next. Now starting to think about what to do with a industrial building packed full of gear and tools. I told the current helper I'm going to dump it on him, since I have no kids to fight over it. But for now I keep a short list of good customers, that I find it easy to get along with. It's been an enjoyable ride, and it's not over yet...
 

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36 years in the trade, worked for 5 companies, over 20 yrs here at the airport. As stated above, the fact I have a pension makes a difference, it also helps my brain that I work with a buddy on new jobs and have a few side jobs that keep me thinking outside the office.

Tim.
 

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I stay as long as they'll have me. I've only quit two job's in my career, only because I got better offer's. After getting beat up, and azz busting in the contracting biz, I found it's easier to work for someone else, and let them have the headaches. Longest I've stuck with a contractor was 12 years. Since going union, I only have to work a few months a year since the wife is full time. Yeah, I'm getting lazy in my old age.
 

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36th year apprentice & Floor Sweeper
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2-1/2 Years
2-1/2 Years
3 Years
2 Weeks
28 Years

The three year company, and the 28 year company, are the same company. The 2 week company was a short call while I was off for six months. That was the '91 recession. And I still managed a pension credit for my worst year. Sometimes I think it would have been nice to bounce around more, and see different stuff, But I've seen plenty, and like the 2,000 hours a year.

I just need eleven more one year jobs
 

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26 1/2 years then company was sold to a multi-national conglomerate who wanted nothing to do with any of the employees, they just wanted to close it for less competition.
3 years with a small r-mix company.
8 months as a millwright at a chemical plant that went bankrupt. The pay was great but I was really disliked by my coworkers there.
5 years at another r-mix company that started to get too corporate.
5 months thus far at my present employer, also r-mix.
I’m about out of r-mix producers around here so I better behave.
 
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