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It has recently been interpreted by an AHJ in FL that pulling bare copper ground wire in metal conduit is a code violation. We have asked for a code reference, but I suspect it will be 342.14 , 344.14, or 358.12(6).
If anyone knows of any code reference that would contradict this ruling, please let me know your input.
 

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Ax grinder
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So how would running a bare copper ground wire in a steel conduit be any different than attaching a copper EGC at a steel box?

There is no prohibition in the NEC to installing a bare copper EGC in a steel conduit.

Take a look at 250.118(1) this section specifically permits a bare copper conductor to be used as an EGC.

Chris
 

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Yeah Toast!!
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It has recently been interpreted by an AHJ in FL that pulling bare copper ground wire in metal conduit is a code violation. We have asked for a code reference, but I suspect it will be 342.14 , 344.14, or 358.12(6).
If anyone knows of any code reference that would contradict this ruling, please let me know your input.
I believe that the above stated sections have to do with dissimilar metals as related to aluminum and copper connected together which will cause a galvanic action not a copper ground wire coming in contact with metal conduit.

A bare EGC in conduit is a bit uncommon trade practice though.
 

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I believe that the above stated sections have to do with dissimilar metals as related to aluminum and copper connected together which will cause a galvanic action not a copper ground wire coming in contact with metal conduit.

A bare EGC in conduit is a bit uncommon trade practice though.


This is true, we have to wrap our conduits if they come into to close of contact with copper plumbing pipes.
 

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Which county did this, Orange or Seminole?
 

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Bare ground wires

I have gotten my butt ripped about power factor, so I am not afraid of this one. Someone in Florida is thinking that if you run a bare "Equipment grounding conductor" in EMT you are definitely creating a parallel path of fault current, if a fault current exists. The problem is when the (parallel path of fault current is interrupted by a BREAK, as a loose, or non existent tight coupling. Theoretically, at the point of the (LOST) connection in the conduit, an Inductive choke could be developed and an IMPEDENCE is set up as to restrict the FAULT CURRENT, and slowing the tripping of the overload device which would be measured in cycles per second. That is my story and I'm sticking to it.

RIVETER
 

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You are correct, the fault is a pre- existing condition.

So what happens when one the hack electricians leaves the copper connection loose? The argument some use of loose connections can be applied to any thing we do. I say if that is the quality of work you do or are use to sub it all out to professionals.


I can argue that all wiring should be in rigid for the same reason. A hack electrician improperly installs NM and nicks the insulation, better use rigid.

So the point is when properly installed there is no issue, if you cannot properly install it hang drywall.
 
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