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Wyome
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am pricing a job that will require me to break off two 1" vertical seal offs, three 3/4" vertical seal offs, replace the wire and re pour the new seal offs. Class 1 Div 1. I am putting in 7 hours for breaking the seal offs and one hour each for pouring the new ones. I wonder if that is enough time. Has anyone done this? How long does it take to break a seal off? I know the few times I have poured these, it always takes me more time than I expected. I hope to use a grinder to split the seal offs and then break them with two small sledges. Anyone use Chico Speed seal? It looks like it could save some time. Not cheap though. $50 worth might do 2 seals. Thanks
 

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I use 1.5 hours just for an original install and pouring of a seal...less if there are a number of them in close proximity to each other.

If the seals are in the middle of a run, that is an location where you cannot remove the conduit on one side of the seal, you will have to add unions and rework the conduit. If you have to do this, then I would just cut the conduit on the side that has to be reworked and spin the seals off the other conduit.
 

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I am pricing a job that will require me to break off two 1" vertical seal offs, three 3/4" vertical seal offs, replace the wire and re pour the new seal offs. Class 1 Div 1. I am putting in 7 hours for breaking the seal offs and one hour each for pouring the new ones. I wonder if that is enough time. Has anyone done this? How long does it take to break a seal off? I know the few times I have poured these, it always takes me more time than I expected. I hope to use a grinder to split the seal offs and then break them with two small sledges. Anyone use Chico Speed seal? It looks like it could save some time. Not cheap though. $50 worth might do 2 seals. Thanks
To me, the labor seems adequate. Don't forget to figure in the use of UNYs or UNFs to reinstall. I went back and read post# 2. He has the right idea.
 

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I would figure some rework to the conduit. Depending on how carried away someone was pouring the seals originally, it could be impossible to unscrew either end of the seal. If you are considering the epoxy(?) premixed sealing mixture, I do not like it. After the epoxy is activated you must use it quickly. It also seems to overfill the seal off and make a mess. The regular Chico only takes a few seconds more to mix and is easier to control the amount used. A long plastic funnel that the spout will fit in a 3/4" hole is a great help.
 

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If you are repulling the conductors, why not just cut through the centers of the seals and avoid trying to bust them with two hammers? Depending on the layout, you may have to modify the conduit to allow for UNYs.. Is using a split seal an option?

Also, not sure if it would help, but in lots of cases area classification seals were installed and are no longer required, such as when a whole area is reclassified to Class 1 Div 2.. Are yours still needed? If not a Condulet C would save a ton of time...
 

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I'm curious as to how you wound up with 3 3/4" sealoffs. Usually the conduit is sealed at both ends, and if you are pulling new wire, the number of seals wind up being an even number.
 

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I don't know if anyone else does this but I use those big disposable syringes modified with a piece of 3/8" tubing to pour my sealoffs.
 

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I'm curious as to how you wound up with 3 3/4" sealoffs. Usually the conduit is sealed at both ends, and if you are pulling new wire, the number of seals wind up being an even number.
Very few of the conduit runs I install have more than one seal. Most just have the boundary seal. It is Class I, Division 2 area, and we have very few items in the field that require a seal.
 

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I'm pretty good at slicing them with the grinder. I get as close to threads as possible then I slam a 3/4" cold chisel in. Same way I get stuck gal and black iron apart.
 

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I'm pretty good at slicing them with the grinder. I get as close to threads as possible then I slam a 3/4" cold chisel in. Same way I get stuck gal and black iron apart.
I have done that where I needed to save the wire, but used a hacksaw for the cut as the seal was in the classified area.

The OP said that the wire was to be replaced, so I would not take the time to split the seal.
 

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Very few of the conduit runs I install have more than one seal. Most just have the boundary seal. It is Class I, Division 2 area, and we have very few items in the field that require a seal.
I mostly worked on gas stations and bulk plants. Kind of hard to get out of the classified areas with one stick of conduit in those locations.
 

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Wyome
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I use 1.5 hours just for an original install and pouring of a seal...less if there are a number of them in close proximity to each other.

If the seals are in the middle of a run, that is an location where you cannot remove the conduit on one side of the seal, you will have to add unions and rework the conduit. If you have to do this, then I would just cut the conduit on the side that has to be reworked and spin the seals off the other conduit.
I do anticipate some conduit rework. And unions.
 

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Wyome
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you are repulling the conductors, why not just cut through the centers of the seals and avoid trying to bust them with two hammers? Depending on the layout, you may have to modify the conduit to allow for UNYs.. Is using a split seal an option?

Also, not sure if it would help, but in lots of cases area classification seals were installed and are no longer required, such as when a whole area is reclassified to Class 1 Div 2.. Are yours still needed? If not a Condulet C would save a ton of time...
I guess split seal could be an option. I don't know about reclassification here. This is an above ground storage tank (3 tanks combined as one structure. One for regular gas, one for premium and one for diesel) situation with dispensers. Most of the work will be closest to the diesel dispenser but still within 20' radius of gasoline dispensers.
 

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Wyome
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
1/2 the time, they are poured very thin or not at all.
Most of the time, I can break out the Chico with a screwdriver.
If I can't do that I drill them out
last resort, cut and use a union and a nipple on one side.
I know they are poured. I don't know how well. If I get the project, I will be checking if I have to remove them or not. I want to put enough time in the bid to replace if needed.
 

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Wyome
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm curious as to how you wound up with 3 3/4" sealoffs. Usually the conduit is sealed at both ends, and if you are pulling new wire, the number of seals wind up being an even number.
The 3/4" seal offs are on top of the the 3 tanks for remote read level sensors. Veeder Root system. Out of the sensor to the seal off and then to guat for splicing. Then 3/4" grc down to the top of the 1" union. Someone used a re bushing there. I don't know if that bushing is proper or not. Planning on keeping most of that original except for the seal seal off.
 

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Wyome
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have done that where I needed to save the wire, but used a hacksaw for the cut as the seal was in the classified area.

The OP said that the wire was to be replaced, so I would not take the time to split the seal.
I am concerned about using a grinder or sawzall in classified area, but it is outside and in the diesel area so maybe I won't blow myself up.
 
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