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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are buccannon crimps listed for splicing hot and neutral wires? I know it was (or still is) a common practice, but the regular crimps you pick up at the SH or HD don't say anything on the package other than being intended for splicing the grounding conductor.

Do you you have to buy a certain type of crimps or something for splicing the hot and neutral conductors, or is this just a typical overlooked technical violation? Can anybody shed any light on this.
 

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If you look it up, sold by Ideal, you need to use the proper tool. Doesn't specify grounding specifically. They also sell the insulated caps too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you look it up, sold by Ideal, you need to use the proper tool. Doesn't specify grounding specifically. They also sell the insulated caps too.
Yeah, I know about the insulated caps. But, how about the regular ones? I'd like to see a link or something that can answer this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Im talking about the un-insulated barrel crimps. Buccannons.
 

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The only hint I see on Ideals website is that the insulators are rated for 105 Celsius, which tells me they are indeed for current carrying conductors. I sure hope they are for current since we used tons of those over the years!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Those be them.
Yeah, I must have missed your post with the links. mmmm...looks like from the pics and the 300v rating, that this is a legal splice. Listed, compliant, and cheap too. Although the fact that you would have to wrap it with tape would offset your labor a little...

Good post. :thumbsup:
 

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I see them from time to time. I have the tool, though I only use it for grounds when I'm not using greenies. I also have some fork terminals made by them as well. Fork on the end of a crimp sleeve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just use my kleins with the crimp punch on the handles. I cant see buying a stakon tool just for that.
 

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Buzzy304E
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I just use my kleins with the crimp punch on the handles. I cant see buying a stakon tool just for that.
A few years back, I went through a friends house and cut out/replaced every single crimp, which I am sure was done after your fashion. He had about four or five wires with poorly made connections burn back from their boxes and into the wall cavity. The last one, when he finally called me, was in the bedroom of his two sons, ages 4 and six.

Buy the correct tool. Nearly every box had another loose connection, disasters waiting to happen. The correct tool is not a pair of StaKons.

Better yet, don't even bother with that splicing method.
 
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Arsholeprentice
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A few years back, I went through a friends house and cut out/replaced every single crimp, which I am sure was done after your fashion. He had about four or five wires with poorly made connections burn back from their boxes and into the wall cavity. The last one, when he finally called me, was in the bedroom of his two sons, ages 4 and six.

Buy the correct tool. Nearly every box had another loose connection, disasters waiting to happen.

Better yet, don't even bother with that splicing method.
Exactly, don't even bother with it. How freakin long does it take to do a really good solid splice?

We get at least one call per week with these connectors and around two with back stabbed plugs. They are nice money makers when people see the burnt up wiring, they almost always agree to resplice the connection points, unless it's a rental, then they don't care.:whistling2:
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A few years back, I went through a friends house and cut out/replaced every single crimp, which I am sure was done after your fashion. He had about four or five wires with poorly made connections burn back from their boxes and into the wall cavity. The last one, when he finally called me, was in the bedroom of his two sons, ages 4 and six.

Buy the correct tool. Nearly every box had another loose connection, disasters waiting to happen. The correct tool is not a pair of StaKons.

Better yet, don't even bother with that splicing method.
I've had to go back on my splices and take them apart before, usually because some framing changed on the job after the wire was pulled and made up. The only way to take one off without damaging or cutting the conductors was to chop one side with a pair of ***** and pry the crimp off. Klein makes all kinds of linesmen - some with fish tape pulling grooves, some with a crimp punch. Its a solid connection, Im not worried about it.
 

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Buzzy304E
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I've had to go back on my splices and take them apart before, usually because some framing changed on the job after the wire was pulled and made up. The only way to take one off without damaging or cutting the conductors was to chop one side with a pair of ***** and pry the crimp off. Klein makes all kinds of linesmen - some with fish tape pulling grooves, some with a crimp punch. Its a solid connection, Im not worried about it.
In doing this, you have wasted way more time and material than using standard wire nuts. You are penny wise, and pound foolish. You gave the impression of being very cost-conscious, but it is an illusion, or self delusion.

Why not get out a solder pot and a roll of friction tape?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
In doing this, you have wasted way more time and material than using standard wire nuts. You are penny wise, and pound foolish. You gave the impression of being very cost-conscious, but it is an illusion, or self delusion.

Why not get out a solder pot and a roll of friction tape?
I will admit that some people can get so fixated on saving every last dime, that they waste a dollar or two in the process.

So, why don't you explain to me how I'm being fooled here by counting pennies..
 

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Buzzy304E
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Better yet, save another buck and just chomp down on 'em with your teeth - all five of them.:laughing:
 

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Are buccannon crimps listed for splicing hot and neutral wires? I know it was (or still is) a common practice, but the regular crimps you pick up at the SH or HD don't say anything on the package other than being intended for splicing the grounding conductor.

Do you you have to buy a certain type of crimps or something for splicing the hot and neutral conductors, or is this just a typical overlooked technical violation? Can anybody shed any light on this.
I only use that type in refrigeration. I don't know why other than that is all I have ever found in refrigeration units.
 

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I was looking at buying a Buchanan C-24 crimper.

I saw them but some would have "8 In L" in the description and were about twice the price of the others.

Both say in the specs that they are C-24, so what is the "8 In L" and what is the difference in the two?
 
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