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· Registered
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The question is really whether or not it's the act of a restraining order being filed and granted or an actual violation of said order being grounds for revocation.

How likely is that to occur given a successful granting of the RO, even if there is no documented illegal activity? If clarification is required on this or any part of this I'm glad to oblige.
 

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An RO is placed between two parties. That can be a individual and an individual, or an individual and an entity. It has nothing to do with your employment unless it was initiated by your employer. Still, this has nothing to do with a master’s license.
 

· Chief Flunky
Field Service Engineer
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An RO by itself has nothing to do with revoking licenses. It’s a separate legal order.

Licenses always have some sort of “good standing” clause. For instance the issuing agency can revoke a license if you threaten or actually attack a member of the organization that issues it. There is usually a hearing and/or you can appeal usually via the courts.

Also if the issue involves your employer and they are paying your license fees and they call the board and “drop” you, you might have to call and get everything put in your name and pay past dues. You might just be suspended for nonpayment or someone made an honest mistake based on what HR told them like misinterpreting what “left the company” means (left the company or left the trade). A phone call can determine where you stand and get it straightened out. Again not RO related.

I know the “good standing” for engineers can be very broadly interpreted. In Missouri for instance an engineer had a felony for a matter completely unrelated to work. The license was not revoked until they sent him a bill and the wife called and explained the situation. They would not suspend or renew, only cancel. And after time served they would not issue a new one.

The issuing entity would be in serious legal jeopardy if they revoked the license before conviction. But then again in the recent Duke LaCrosse players case a DA managed to get three players kicked out of school without a conviction and all kinds of other actions taken. The entire case was based on a completely fabricated rape story from a girl. The end result was Duke had to revoke everything and pay $20 million in restitution to each player. The DA was disbarred and went to prison on felony charges, and went bankrupt paying damages as well. The City of Durham talked about criminal justice reform (defund the police) but since Durham is a famous libtard dumpster fire in the first place this went nowhere, and the equally corrupt and slimy state attorney general slithered his way into the governors mansion.
 

· Administrator
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My guess is even if there was a misdemeanor involved it won't matter. I am quite certain a felony will cause a revocation of your license
 
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