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can you just take electrician tests to become a aprentice
from what im reading you dont necessarily have to take the classes
Typically employers that offer formal apprenticeships require applicants to at minimum have a high school diploma and basic algebra. Often they will use testing as part of the selection process. If you go through a formal registered apprenticeship program, classes will be required. The North Carolina Apprenticeship Act is managed by the NCDOL.

Each state has different rules regarding the licensing of electricians. Some states require all apprentices to be registered and go through a formal program in order to become eligible to sit for the journeyman examination. Other states don't require any licensing for electricians, and only require electrical contractors to be licensed.
http://www.ncbeec.org/
 

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sure, go for it. why learn from classes and other people's knowledge when you can go out and blow stuff up on your own.
That makes no sense. Why do I always see the pattern of spite in professionals when someone is willing to be self taught?

In all honesty if one has enough brains and determination with the right guidance they can become the best contributors to the trade.
 

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That makes no sense. Why do I always see the pattern of spite in professionals when someone is willing to be self taught?

In all honesty if one has enough brains and determination with the right guidance they can become the best contributors to the trade.
your point is well taken.

I guess I just feel that the whole point of apprenticeship is to hand down and impart knowledge from experienced tradesman, so that mistakes don't have to be repeated, and good work practices can be handed down. Why miss out on that if you have the opportunity to do so ?
 

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your point is well taken.

I guess I just feel that the whole point of apprenticeship is to hand down and impart knowledge from experienced tradesman, so that mistakes don't have to be repeated, and good work practices can be handed down. Why miss out on that if you have the opportunity to do so ?

I think he wants an apprenticeship rather than just skipping ahead.
 

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If you're looking for a formal electrical apprenticeship, I'm sure the apprenticeship coordinator at the college may also be able to help you with names of companies participating in the state program and the classes required.

Salem Electric Co
We are involved in a state supported Electrical Apprenticeship Program in conjunction with Forsyth Technical Community College. In doing so, we are able to provide you the very best as your chosen residential, commercial or industrial electric company. This is a four-year program requiring 500 hours of classroom training and 8000 hours of on-the-job training.

The apprentices that work for us are required to attend two classes per week between September and August in their first four years. This allows us to employ the most competent residential and commercial electrical contractor team. For more information on our residential and commercial electrical contractor apprentice program or any other questions, please call us today.
Here's a link to another company in your area to check out: http://184.107.135.130/~watsonel/x_apprentice.html
 
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