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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been a jman electrician for the past 10 years and am ready for a change. I've done a combination of oil and gas, agricultural, residential, and quality control work and have worked in a foreman capacity on multiple job sites. I'm currently making 75k a year working in the lower mainland of BC, Canada. I want to build on my current skills sets and work experience to transition into another higher paying job role.

I would be willing to do some additional training/schooling but nothing too crazy because I'm 45.

Would really appreciate any ideas, thoughts, and suggestions you might have.

Thanks.
 

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have you looked at power engineering? Much of that is learned on the job, distance learning, etc. Check with bcit.

I transitioned to marine... not for the money, but the shift-work makes for more time off and less painful commuting. I looked at other trades, but they meant starting over on the wage scale.
 

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We here in the US call it a PE license. Professional Engineer, takes training, and passing some tests. Here your licensed by the state and can draw and stamp plans. If you hustle it might add another $40 k a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
have you looked at power engineering? Much of that is learned on the job, distance learning, etc. Check with bcit.

I transitioned to marine... not for the money, but the shift-work makes for more time off and less painful commuting. I looked at other trades, but they meant starting over on the wage scale.
Thanks for the suggestion. Definitely going to look into that.
 

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We here in the US call it a PE license. Professional Engineer, takes training, and passing some tests. Here your licensed by the state and can draw and stamp plans. If you hustle it might add another $40 k a year.
So would it be reasonable to say that professional engineers are fairly consistently making 100k per year?
 

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I thought a PE in Canada was like a masters or doctorate level degree in engineering from a university.... I'd love to be wrong though.
 

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I've been a jman electrician for the past 10 years and am ready for a change. I've done a combination of oil and gas, agricultural, residential, and quality control work and have worked in a foreman capacity on multiple job sites. I'm currently making 75k a year working in the lower mainland of BC, Canada. I want to build on my current skills sets and work experience to transition into another higher paying job role.

I would be willing to do some additional training/schooling but nothing too crazy because I'm 45.

Would really appreciate any ideas, thoughts, and suggestions you might have.

Thanks.
Sounds like the makings of a new business. :)
 

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You're correct. A PE(professional engineer) is a 4 year degree and time spent as a junior engineer. A Power Engineer is a trade with mostly work related training. Only ever really see postings for it at large facilities/institutions.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You're correct. A PE(professional engineer) is a 4 year degree and time spent as a junior engineer. A Power Engineer is a trade with mostly work related training. Only ever really see postings for it at large facilities/institutions.

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Just to clarify- you usually over see postings for Power Engineers at large facilities?
 

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Get your masters license and either open your own shop or even better (based on what your were saying) be a qualifier for someone else. If you take over the role of running the electrical division of a multi-trades contractor, you will be using your leadership and electrician skills and you should make more money. It may even be possible to become a partner.
 

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Just to clarify- you usually over see postings for Power Engineers at large facilities?
Yes, here is what the ITABC says about the trade.

"As a power engineer you’ll maintain and operate heating and power plants, refrigeration systems and auxiliary equipment like pumps, compressors, steam turbines, electrical generators, cooling towers and water treatment systems. You’ll have the opportunity to work in commercial facilities like hospitals, schools and apartment buildings, or industrial facilities like mines, mills, power generation stations and petrochemical plants.

Plants are certified and regulated by Technical Safety BC and plant size determines the certification required, ranging from 5th and 4th class for small plants to 2nd and 1st class certificates required for larger plants. "

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I've been a jman electrician for the past 10 years and am ready for a change. I've done a combination of oil and gas, agricultural, residential, and quality control work and have worked in a foreman capacity on multiple job sites. I'm currently making 75k a year working in the lower mainland of BC, Canada. I want to build on my current skills sets and work experience to transition into another higher paying job role.

I would be willing to do some additional training/schooling but nothing too crazy because I'm 45.

Would really appreciate any ideas, thoughts, and suggestions you might have.

Thanks.
Surely there’s something in the electrical field someone with your experience can do to advance? Be it become a contractor , move on to utility distribution or wherever your passion may lay? Don’t be afraid of going back to school at 45, I started back after being out 27 years while dairy farming with my family and you’d no doubt do well.
 
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