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Could anybody help me out with an example of this:

2-110 Material for anchoring to masonry and concrete
-Wood or other similar material shall not be used as an anchor into masonry or concrete for the support of any electrical equipment


Does this mean for example: we can't use a piece of plywood to fasten a breaker panel to a concrete wall?
 

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Basically wood will break down from moisture that may get into the concrete or masonry. You would have to use lead anchors or those plastic anchors. They used to make a rawl plug that was made out of some wood mesh also-- those could not be used.


 

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Ok so Im confused myself. I have seen electrical rooms where they will plywood sheet all walls so then equipment can be mounted to the plywood. Is this not allowed anymore?
 

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Yes it's allowed, but usually needs to be fire rated plywood.. but the code rule is specifically about the plugs you put in holes you drill in concrete.

Yes to plastic and lead anchors, no to wood plugs.
 

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The answers offered cover the intent. See how really old rules confuse people? I have not seen a natural fiber plug for decades. All plastic, lead )is pretty rare) or metal inserts. Speaking of metal inserts, a lot of expansion plugs are no longer approved for use in concrete. They are too unreliable and depend on user clearly knowing when the wedge is correctly set.

We put plywood on walls to ease equipment mounting. IE don't have to find the studs :)
 

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In the old days it was common to drill a hole in poured concrete, whittle a plug out of a chunk of wood about the size of the hole (often with an axe) and then drive the piece of wood flush into the hole. Then attach whatever they wanted to the wall with a regular lag bolt into the piece of wood. It's pretty dry here so above grade it worked well; below grade not so much.

That is what the code rule is prohibiting.
 
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