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Ive done this a bunch of times, but was just wondering everyone else's process. I obviously switch the neutral to the new 2 pole breaker and label it with black tape to show it as a hot wire. I mark it with black tape at the load as well. Should I be tracking down every junction point along the way to re-identify the neutral as a hot?
 

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Electrical Simpleton
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The answer is always do what the inspector tells you, not what the code book says. :laughing:
I need to be an inspector in Canada... I could stop reading the code book.:)

Pete
 

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Not required, unless it's required. :whistling2:

Code book only requires bond be bare or green, and identified conductor (neutral) be white or grey. The other colours are not mandatory, unless they're mandatory. :laughing:
But there is likely a section saying white can only be used with grounded conductors.
 

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Ive done this a bunch of times, but was just wondering everyone else's process. I obviously switch the neutral to the new 2 pole breaker and label it with black tape to show it as a hot wire. I mark it with black tape at the load as well. Should I be tracking down every junction point along the way to re-identify the neutral as a hot?
First off, is this a cable job or a pipe and wire job?

If it is a pipe and wire job the NEC prohibits reidentifing the white or using the white as anything but a grounded conductor.


200.7 Use of Insulation of a White or Gray Color or
with Three Continuous White Stripes.

(A) General.
The following shall be used only for the
grounded circuit conductor
, unless otherwise permitted in
200.7(B) and (C):

(1) A conductor with continuous white or gray covering

(2) A conductor with three continuous white stripes on
other than green insulation

(3) A marking of white or gray color at the termination
If it is cable yes you can do it but you are supposed to re-identify it at each accessible point.

200.7(C) Circuits of 50 Volts or More. The use of insulation
that is white or gray or that has three continuous white
stripes for other than a grounded conductor for circuits of
50 volts or more shall be permitted only as in (1) and (2).

(1) If part of a cable assembly that has the insulation permanently
reidentified to indicate its use as an ungrounded
conductor by marking tape, painting, or other
effective means at its termination and at each location
where the conductor is visible and accessible.
Identification
shall encircle the insulation and shall be a color
other than white, gray, or green. If used for single-pole,
3-way or 4-way switch loops, the reidentified conductor
with white or gray insulation or three continuous
white stripes shall be used only for the supply to the
switch, but not as a return conductor from the switch to
the outlet.
 

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FrunkSlammer said:
In Canada, I don't bother marking a white when it becomes a hot conductor.. maybe NEC requires it though.
that's only legal for switch legs. If you use it for a 2-pole or 3-pole circuit you have to colour it.
meadow said:
Doesn't Canada have Romex where the white is changed to red as an option, ie Canada has real 12-2 240 volt wire.
Yes and the outer jacket is bright red too. You can get it in 14, 12, 10 and 8. Most people don't use it for switch legs though because who would carry around a separate reel of wire during rough in just for those? Also thst method of switching is not very popular in houses here anymore. Red Romex is very common for 208/240v heat, hot water tanks and air conditioners though.
 

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Vintage Sounds said:
that's only legal for switch legs. If you use it for a 2-pole or 3-pole circuit you have to colour it. Yes and the outer jacket is bright red too. You can get it in 14, 12, 10 and 8. Most people don't use it for switch legs though because who would carry around a separate reel of wire during rough in just for those? Also thst method of switching is not very popular in houses here anymore. Red Romex is very common for 208/240v heat, hot water tanks and air conditioners though.
Good for fire alarm buzzers/strobes too
 

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Should I be tracking down every junction point along the way to re-identify the neutral as a hot?
What does common sense tell you?

The re identifying isn't the biggest issue. The fact that it may be supplying a 120V outlet somewhere would be a bigger concern.

If someone taps into a black/white circuit without testing voltage first, they deserve some smoke.:jester:
 

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I used the red sheath for fire alarm on a big site.. What the heck is securex? Sounds expensive.
that's only legal for switch legs. If you use it for a 2-pole or 3-pole circuit you have to colour it.
It's definitely a good idea and probably many jurisdiction require it, but where does CEC say that's mandatory? Because 4-038 specifically says "Where colour-coded circuits are required" and when I was an apprentice in school our professor had told us that only neutral must be white, it's the only colour rule. (and bond green/bare of course) It's one of the few things I distinctly remember from school. lol

Did something change in 2012?
 

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I used the red sheath for fire alarm on a big site.. What the heck is securex? Sounds expensive.
It's definitely a good idea and probably many jurisdiction require it, but where does CEC say that's mandatory? Because 4-038 specifically says "Where colour-coded circuits are required" and when I was an apprentice in school our professor had told us that only neutral must be white, it's the only colour rule. (and bond green/bare of course) It's one of the few things I distinctly remember from school. lol

Did something change in 2012?
Nah, these are all established rules. You can't just use whatever colour you feel like whenever, haha.

4-030 Identification of insulated neutral conductors up to and including No. 2 AWG copper or aluminum
(1) Except as permitted in Subrules (2), (3), and (4), all insulated neutral conductors up to and including
No. 2 AWG copper or aluminum, and the conductors of flexible cords that are permanently connected to
such neutral conductors, shall be identified by a white or grey covering or by three continuous white stripes
along the entire length of the conductor.
(3) The covering of the other conductor or conductors shall show a continuous colour contrasting that of
an identified conductor
; however, in the case of those flexible cords where the identified conductor is
identified by a raised longitudinal ridge(s), the other conductors shall have no ridges.


4-036 Use of identified conductors
(1) An identified conductor shall not be used as a conductor for which identification is not required by
these Rules
; however, in armoured cable, aluminum-sheathed cable, copper-sheathed cable, and
non-metallic-sheathed cable work, the identified conductor shall be permitted to be rendered permanently
unidentifiable by painting or other suitable means at every point where the separate conductors have been
rendered accessible and visible by removal of the outer covering of the cable.
(2) Where armoured cable, aluminum-sheathed cable, copper-sheathed cable, or non-metallic-sheathed cable
containing an identified conductor is used for single-pole, three-way, or four-way switch loops, it shall not be necessary to render the identified conductor permanently unidentified
at the switch if the connections
are made so that an unidentified conductor is the return conductor from the switch to the outlet.
Also, Securex is just another name for FAS cable. you know, the red stuff usually 3 to 6 conductor 18 or 16, just for F/A systems or sometimes used for thermostats and other LV purposes.
 
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