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My son works on video games and they are having problems with games near the ocean getting sand and dried salt buildup on the boards. He asked me (and I don't know so I'm asking y'all) if there is a spray solvent that would clean the board and not damage it.

Also, is there a product that can be sprayed on the board that will help keep the salt build up from getting on the components and still allow heat dissipation and not interfere with the operation of the electronic components?

Thanks to all that help.
 

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Was that you asking for a spray coating about a year ago? Conformal coating...the brand we use is Humiseal.

It would be best to remove the boards and wash with liquid soap, soft brush, and water in a sink. Then dry with compressed air. If you can't remove the boards then...it will suck trying to get them clean. Whatever you use needs to be water based for the salt.
 

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My son works on video games and they are having problems with games near the ocean getting sand and dried salt buildup on the boards. He asked me (and I don't know so I'm asking y'all) if there is a spray solvent that would clean the board and not damage it.

Also, is there a product that can be sprayed on the board that will help keep the salt build up from getting on the components and still allow heat dissipation and not interfere with the operation of the electronic components?

Thanks to all that help.
This stuff might help LOU.:)

http://www.samsclub.com/sams/contac...pid=CSE_Froogle&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=172594


.
 

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Before you immerse any board you should discharge any caps soldered onto it.
 
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Isopropyl is a good all-purpose electrical cleaner. I've never heard of any incompatibilities.

I agree that distilled water will work, the problem is drying it quickly and adequately. It's one of the "secrets" of electrical restoration work that fixing really contaminated equipment, the first step is often to use a whole lot of water. I often wonder what our customers think on flood jobs where the very first thing we do is break out the hoses. :laughing:
 

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Isopropyl is a good all-purpose electrical cleaner. I've never heard of any incompatibilities.

I agree that distilled water will work, the problem is drying it quickly and adequately. It's one of the "secrets" of electrical restoration work that fixing really contaminated equipment, the first step is often to use a whole lot of water. I often wonder what our customers think on flood jobs where the very first thing we do is break out the hoses. :laughing:
99% isopropyl alcohol would also be my choice if the boards can't be removed easily but they need to be well flooded and scrubbed with a soft paintbrush to remove the salty coating. Maybe 2 or 3 times to do it right.

We use a water soluble flux and put all of our newly manufactured boards in a commercial dishwasher with liquid soap. They come out squeaky clean. :laughing:
 

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My son works on video games and they are having problems with games near the ocean getting sand and dried salt buildup on the boards. He asked me (and I don't know so I'm asking y'all) if there is a spray solvent that would clean the board and not damage it.

Also, is there a product that can be sprayed on the board that will help keep the salt build up from getting on the components and still allow heat dissipation and not interfere with the operation of the electronic components?

Thanks to all that help.
Well the best cover for electrical or electronics is polyurethane spray or liquid I prefer spray .
Heres a tip do not use a vaccum ever on electronics and never blow a circuit board off with air. The days of old they used tunner cleaner to blow off dirt and dust that's over with it will or can fry you chips .
The poly is thin and trust me todays electronics are not like they were years ago they can stand the heat. All your transformers coils today are a coating of poly grade 5 .
If you just want to coat it with something that's not permanent pour it over with mineral oil its the best insulator in the world .
 

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I used to use this when I worked in a factory to clean circuit boards.
If they were real dirty, I would spray them with WD-40 then blow that off.
Then I would spray with the LPS product. Worked great for me!


Make sure you get the kind that says "safe for plastics". There are several kinds of this same brand and the picture might not be the exact one I used as it said right on the front that it was safe for plastics.

Edit: Found the site, check it out. It says safe on plastics!

http://www.lpslabs.com/product-details/578
 

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A Little Short said:
I used to use this when I worked in a factory to clean circuit boards.
If they were real dirty, I would spray them with WD-40 then blow that off.
Then I would spray with the LPS product. Worked great for me!

Make sure you get the kind that says "safe for plastics". There are several kinds of this same brand and the picture might not be the exact one I used as it said right on the front that it was safe for plastics.

Edit: Found the site, check it out. It says safe on plastics!

http://www.lpslabs.com/product-details/578
We use the exact stuff and it seems to do a good job for us also .
 
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