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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An HVAC service guy tried to install heat tape on a furnace exhaust pipe, by running it off the A/C disco!











When I first picked up that piece of PVC conduit after removing it from the A/C disco, a whole lot of water ran out. I don't know how on earth that splice in the LB didn't short.

Also, he tried installing heat tape up in the loft (where the furnace was); to plug it in, he ran MC cable out of the side of the furnace (which runs on natural gas, so it only has a 15A 120v circuit supplying it), and the MC cable ran to a handy box EXTENSION RING (with a receptacle with hot and neutral reversed) that was just lying on the floor!!

The guy who did all this must have known just enough about electricity to be dangerous.
 

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First off, that is not the furnace "exhaust" it's a condensate drain.
There are so many people out there that know just enough about electricity to be quite dangerous, and many of them are in the trades.

TWN
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've never heard of an HVAC guy putting heat tape on anything, let alone a flue pipe. Are you sure the homeowner isn't trying to pass the buck for his stupidity?
I don't know, but she gave me the name of the company that supposedly did it, so unless she's throwing them under the bus...
 

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Why have heat tape on a condensate drain in the first place?
 

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no matter how you look at it, thats one hacked up mess:blink:
 

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On most heat tape there is a built in gfci plug wired in that protects it supposedly. Sounds like a great service call.....reset the gfci :p
 

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ecelectric said:
The high efficiency furnaces have condensate drains that will freeze in the winter and shut the system down
Why on earth would you take the drain out of a wall in climate prone to freezing .
Completely cheap and hack IMO.
Put a pump on it and take it to a drain.
Not rocket science.
Never saw it done like that here, a few guys like to drill holes in basement floor and just stick a pipe in it. This is hack as well IMO
 

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On an existing home you would open up the sheetrock too install the pvc when you could probably just insulate it and install it and the tubing in a peice of gutter that matches the house with less labor cost? Your indoor unit is usually in a attic or a closet, what drain would you take it too?
 

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vasparky27 said:
On an existing home you would open up the sheetrock too install the pvc when you could probably just insulate it and install it and the tubing in a peice of gutter that matches the house with less labor cost? Your indoor unit is usually in a attic or a closet, what drain would you take it too?
Don't have plumbing vents in the attic?
As I said here we usually have basement of some sort.
And cold is alway a issue in winter so you just find a better way to drain it.
 

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FWIW, and I don't know if it applies to the OP, but there are jurisdictions where the plumbing code does not allow any unmetered water (ie condensate) to be run to a sanitary sewer drain. In those jurisdictions, some hvac inspectors will insist that the condensate drain for the high efficiency heater have heat tape where it is run through an unheated space (that being said, a properly run drain should not freeze up outside IMO). I am not condoning the hackish abortion pictured, either (that is obscene)
 

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The high efficiency furnaces have condensate drains that will freeze in the winter and shut the system down
I'm confused.

I was assuming that you are talking about a heat pump but...don't heat pumps freeze up at the condenser in cold climates? They occasionally do here. If it's not a heat pump, I can't imagine a gas/oil fired furnace making condensation.


I'm in the desert and I cant wrap my head around that concept. I understand condensation in the summer with the hot air blowing across the cold coils. Does the cold air blowing across hot coils make condensation???
 
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