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evil bastard
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:thumbsup::laughing: ^

I can't see 240V on the nameplate ? McClary see's it somewhere, or is he assuming it wouldn't give a low voltage indicator if it was only 208V ?
It says 220 on the nameplate but we all know that is nominal voltage. I would buck boost this machine to 240 volts.
 

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It says 220 on the nameplate but we all know that is nominal voltage. I would buck boost this machine to 240 volts.
I would check the motor rating and if it was 220, I think I would boost it to the mid 220s (like 225), maybe up to 230. I would also check into why the voltage was dropping to 200 with a not heavy load.
 

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Regardless whether you finally get 208 out of the feeder or not, you are probably still on the low end for this machine. I have a small hobby machine shop with foreign made drives; most machines in the class you are working on are from either China, India, or Taiwan (there are very few US made machines, and they are made with foreign drives and the like anyway). I am not debating overseas design or workmanship here, but it is known that a lot of these machines like to run on the mid to high end of their nameplate.

When a foreign nameplate asks for "220 volts", that is commonly what they really want/need to function properly. Look on a few professional machinist sites, and you will see what I mean. This comes up frequently, especially around 208 three phase installs.

There are a lot of things happening at the same time on a competent CNC machine. Commonly all three servomotors (three drives) are active at the same time, along with the spindle motor (another drive) and computer controls.

I would suggest that Mr. McClary has the right idea, even when you find all 208 volts. It will probably make the machine happier, and it'll surly make the machine owner happier. Consider buck and boost.

Mark
 
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