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Discussion Starter #1
Do you do your own patch work when it comes to sheetrock & concrete?

I patch sheetrock on (almost) every job where we cut the walls. Never priced a concrete patch yet, but I'd be interested in hearing others experiences with it.

This doesn't even come up on jobs with other trades or large projects, but often with these small jobs, it really makes the customer happier and the job complete.
 

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You and your nonsense.....

If they are gonna pay someone to patch it, it might as well be the guy who did it. There's money to be made. Nobody says it has to be perfect, just good enough till the painter/handyman shows up.

Nobody likes to be left with a hole in their wall, or slab for that matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Does anyone have experience in patching a slab?
The plumbers we work with do their own mix-n-fix. I need to learn how to do it.
 

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Does anyone have experience in patching a slab?
The plumbers we work with do their own mix-n-fix. I need to learn how to do it.
Since floors are covered (usually), it's not that difficult. Just read up or "youtube" and it will all make sense. The biggest trick is to not let the patch be higher than the surrounding floor. DON'T use too much water, don't let it freeze.

I used to pour my own under tank slabs for above ground tanks and over slabs for underground tanks. I quit that when I hit 50.
 
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Do you do your own patch work when it comes to sheetrock & concrete?

I patch sheetrock on (almost) every job where we cut the walls. Never priced a concrete patch yet, but I'd be interested in hearing others experiences with it.

This doesn't even come up on jobs with other trades or large projects, but often with these small jobs, it really makes the customer happier and the job complete.
:no::no::no::no:

Unless you're hard up for work, why would you want to do it? Let a professional handle the job!! They would probably do it cheaper anyway.
 

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In the my area almost all homes, new and old, are Plaster. The older ones have plaster that's like concrete and anywhere from 3/4" to 1 1/4" thick. The new ones are Hard Coat Plaster that's 5/8" thick. Rooms like kitchens and baths are usually smooth plaster but the rest of the house is usually a swirled sand finish or skip trowel. So no, we do not attempt to patch plaster.

Here's an example of plaster, check out the ceiling rosette and coved corners
 

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Discussion Starter #11
:no::no::no::no:

Unless you're hard up for work, why would you want to do it? Let a professional handle the job!! They would probably do it cheaper anyway.
I HATE leaving a job with a hole in the wall and telling somebody to call a sheetrock/painter. A rough patch is stupid easy, any ol' dummy can do it. And I charge extra for it just like anything else.

Now - That's not to say that the guy behind me doesn't complain about the awful patch job I did. This may be the case! :jester: But in my small brain, it's a job well done when we don't leave a customer with a huge hole to stare at.
In the my area almost all homes, new and old, are Plaster. The older ones have plaster that's like concrete and anywhere from 3/4" to 1 1/4" thick. The new ones are Hard Coat Plaster that's 5/8" thick. Rooms like kitchens and baths are usually smooth plaster but the rest of the house is usually a swirled sand finish or skip trowel. So no, we do not attempt to patch plaster.

Here's an example of plaster, check out the ceiling rosette and coved corners
We don't have anything like that around here. Just 1/2" sheetrock with mud & paint on it.

I wouldn't cut into a ceiling that looked like that unless somebody else was handling the cleanup. Geez!
 

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I just tell the customer:
It will cost x amount to do this job without any surface damage or it will cost x amount to do this job with surface damage and you get someone else to repair said damage.
 

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THE "BIG RED MACHINE"
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I don't do stucco repair I used to have a guy that was real good I would farm out the work to
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Nope. I'm an electrician.
Not trying to be a jerk here, but, I wouldn't feel like a real construction worker if I said something like that. Even if it's something you are not comfortable doing, it wouldn't hurt you to learn.

The best electricians ( and plumbers and hvac guys), are half-decent carpenters.
 

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Not trying to be a jerk here, but, I wouldn't feel like a real construction worker if I said something like that. Even if it's something you are not comfortable doing, it wouldn't hurt you to learn.

The best electricians ( and plumbers and hvac guys), are half-decent carpenters.
I have done plumbing, tile, hardwood, roofing, siding, insulation, cabinetry, finishing work; you name it, I have probably done it.

Blobbing some mud in a hole doesn't make me a construction worker.

I work with GC's. My job is to make holes that are easy to patch. I don't carry around mud, spatulas, paintbrushes, etc. The last thing I need in my vehicle is a frozen bucket of mud.
 
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