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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there guys,

So I am an electricians helper, I mostly install plugs, lights, etc.

I've really fallen in love with the trade and decided to delve deep on my own accord. Picked up some textbooks on electrical theory and was just amazed to learn the science behind it all!

Learning that conductors where good because of how many valence electrons where in the last shield and how that operates, etc. How magnestism builds up as current is ran through a conductor and how resistance can either build or lessen dependign on the material.

I was wondering with construction it seems you have to become extremely well versed in the code, I've heard that industrial is more with the theory but there's really no one around these parts to ask, I've also heard it's more just control work, and power system I just have no ideas about.

Are there any subsets of these groups where learning the theory is really important and where the mental game is really big? I've been loving that part of it and would like to really spend my time movin into an area where I really play with the theory of things and have to solve problems.

Cheers guys!

Thanks :)
 

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RIP 1959-2015
Joined
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10,750 Posts
Hey there guys,

So I am an electricians helper, I mostly install plugs, lights, etc.

I've really fallen in love with the trade and decided to delve deep on my own accord. Picked up some textbooks on electrical theory and was just amazed to learn the science behind it all!

Learning that conductors where good because of how many valence electrons where in the last shield and how that operates, etc. How magnestism builds up as current is ran through a conductor and how resistance can either build or lessen dependign on the material.

I was wondering with construction it seems you have to become extremely well versed in the code, I've heard that industrial is more with the theory but there's really no one around these parts to ask, I've also heard it's more just control work, and power system I just have no ideas about.

Are there any subsets of these groups where learning the theory is really important and where the mental game is really big? I've been loving that part of it and would like to really spend my time movin into an area where I really play with the theory of things and have to solve problems.

Cheers guys!

Thanks :)
Motors controls and PLC's ...:thumbsup:
 

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Bilge Rat
motors and controls.........
Joined
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8,849 Posts
If you're good at controls (naturally good; controls are really hard to teach), and can design and modify control systems, you'll be pretty much at the top. True control electricians are nearly impossible to find.
 

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Electrical Contractor
Trying to retire or at least slow down a bit, but life not cooperating
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5,240 Posts
First off, power system electricians usually work for the utilities. Their training seems to be specific to which ever utility is providing it. And afaik, is not transferable between utilities. So, somewhat limited in employment opportunities.
Industrial electricians usually work maintenance for factories etc. They can become very well versed in PLC, controls, all types of automation systems.
Construction electricians are the most versatile. Yes code is important to know, so that they can build the projects. Construction electricians also do service and maintenance work.
I would suggest you get your construction journeyman license and then explore the industrial side once and if you get bored building stuff lol
 

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PPE Saves Fingers
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291 Posts
Speaking as the local utilities equivalent of power system electrician (We're designated as Power Electricians here), Wcord's pretty close to the mark on us.

We're a not a red seal trade, and our training is usually dictated by the utility we work for, but it is transferable, if the utility you're going to is willing to accept it.

In my own case, the training is pretty close to that of a Construction Electrician (Levels 1 and 2 are identical, 3 has some hours moved around, we get more theory, don't need to do the preventative mtce course, 4 is where most of the difference is).

I'd break it down as follows:
Construction Electrician - Little bit of everything, heavy on the residential & commercial work. No path is really closed, as they can work just about anywhere (city, rural, oil patch)
Industrial Electrician - Mostly controls and troubleshooting, limited opportunities to get started
Power System Electrician - Little bit of everything (particularity if your utility operates remote sites and you're the only type of electrician around... fixing *&^#ing vacuums...), heavy on the higher voltage equipment work, amount of troubleshooting depends on the systems on site.

That said, go after Construction Electrician ticket. It's accepted by utilities, commercial, residential and industrial, and if you want to get more specialized by going down an Instrumentation or Power System path, you've got the fundamentals.

And I'm fairly sure that if you are being called an "electrician's helper" anywhere in Canada, you're being taken advantage of.

I'm fairly certain that in all provinces & territories all the electrical trades are "designated trades", which means that you need to be either a registered journeyman in the trade, or a registered apprentice working with a registered journeyman to preform electrical work anywhere than in your own residence.
 
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