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Discussion Starter #1
Today I was working on a service upgrade on a house which involved relocating the panel. It was an old Nema 1 Bulldog panel which had been outside under a porch and had a number of romex circuits run outside under the porch as well so they needed to be replaced.
The range was fed with a 10-3 that was on a 40A breaker and was about an 80' run. When I was talking with them about it needing to be replaced I mentioned that it has probably hasn't caused them serious issues is because they don't often run the whole range at once. The wife then told me that during canning season she may actually have burners and the stove running at the same time. She then said that it seemed that it didn't heat as fast or as well when she did that.
That got me to thinking that perhaps because it is all resistive loads, it would self regulate the current due to voltage drop, and actually keep itself from burning up the wire. Not that I think its a good idea, but it is an intriguing thought. It has been operating that way for probably over 20 years and I did not see any obvious insulation damage on the wire.


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You won't burn up number 10 on a range that doesn't trip a 40 amp breaker. You could probably put 60 amps through it and the only thing that would happen is the insulation would discolor
 

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I'd like to add... the elements still cycle thermostatically when they are all 'on'. Your best chance at a longer peak load is going all-on with a cold stove.

I had #10 and 40A breaker on mine too... it would seem from 1973 until I moved in and caught it on the kitchen reno (2013?). Wire seems ok too. Run might be 40-50'.
 

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What was the actual current? Maybe stove was only rated 30 amps.
But yes VD could of caused some sort of self regulation but probably not enough, think of a transformer power in = power out.

Cowboy
 

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Voltage drop would account for some less current.

But average old run of the mill stove.

Oven ... 1500 watts
2 x big stove elements .. 1500 x 2 ... 3000 watts
2 x small elements .. 750 x 2 ... 1500 watts

6000 Watts @ 240V = 25A


When you FIRST turn on a cold oven, both elements come on, so that is 3000 watts. But the broiler element shuts down once the heat is within about 150˚
Gezzzzz .... don't you guys cook ??? :p
 
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You guys cook with electricity? Try propane/gas, you'll never look back.
 

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You should see what a gas convection oven does for homemade bread.......
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I did not check the current draw on it. At that point it didn't matter any more. It is a regular range. I guarantee no one did any calculations on sizing the circuit based on all the other jackleg wiring in the house.

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