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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We don't do too much of it but sometimes we get into wiring a shop or something and it's being finished with sheet metal. Usually the wire gets stubbed out the center and then we have to cut the box in. We usually use tin snips and a gangable box but damn there's got to be a better way. It takes forever and there's so often some wood or strapping or studs behind that need to be dealt with too. Any ideas?
 

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We don't do too much of it but sometimes we get into wiring a shop or something and it's being finished with sheet metal. Usually the wire gets stubbed out the center and then we have to cut the box in. We usually use tin snips and a gangable box but damn there's got to be a better way. It takes forever and there's so often some wood or strapping or studs behind that need to be dealt with too. Any ideas?
Pop a 7/8 hole and use a jig saw
 

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Install, troubleshoot, maintain, and upgrade electrical systems, plant utilities, PLC's, mechanical
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Roto zip.

Worked on some conference/meeting rooms where sheets of metal were glued to the sheetrock, then a cloth covering was placed over that.

They could hang charts and drawings with magnets, without damaging the wall.

We were asked not to mount our boxes until after the metal and cloth were applied.

Used a rotor zip to cut the holes for the switch and receptacle boxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nibbles are easier to use.


If i know its non flammable then a angle grinder with a cutting disk is my preferred tool but you do need to know how to use one safely (keeping it on the right part of the disk so it doesn't kick back)
Grinder won't work cause it makes the cut lines way too big
 

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Is this some kind of industrial or heavy commercial installation? Why are you even reassessing the receptacles as if it was a house? Just use half-inch galvanized threaded conduit pipe, and use weatherproof outdoor boxes with regular square plastic covers and get that steam punk look going on?

Maybe even skip receptacles all together and go with plug mold 12 inches on center.

in the ATM rooms and data closet in banks and server rooms large and small, we use a metal trough with snap and covers and a variety of different snap in cover plates. The trough has channels for high-voltage and low-voltage, and the snapping plates of a duplex receptacles and singlex twist locks etc. And standard box size knockouts with threaded holes so you can mount any standard device including ports to hold cat five and cat six and so on and so forth if you want jacks… Or just grommet holes in your low-voltage trough.
 

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I pretwist and then use wire nuts. Solder pots rule.
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Even better buy a 4" hole saw and use round boxes, just pop them right in the hole

View attachment 167614
Great Idea 30 years ago, but won’t fly now.
That center screw isn’t enough to hold/bond the receptacle.

Ya, I we still use them in the shop ceilings, just don’t tell safety.
 

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Grinder won't work cause it makes the cut lines way too big
he was talking about a thin metal cutting blade (often known as a metabo blade) on the grinder, not an actual grinding disc
you can buy the cut blades in fiber that wear away, or in carbide tipped metal that lasts a great deal longer

i have not needed to cut metal sheets with mine but i do cut vinyl siding (during a service upgrade) metal piping, and everything else i want to cut
 

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Estwing magic
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I use the Bosch carbide oscillating blades and they hold up well cutting metal (and I’m not being a Bosch fanboy here 😊). Bosch blades are different than the peasant brands like Milwaukee, though.
 

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I use a jig saw, a metal blade and a couple of holes inside the opening I'm looking at making. I'll also put a couple layers of masking tape or painters tape on the bottom of my jigsaw's feet, to help minimize scratches on the surface.
 

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Electrical contractor 37 years. Electrical inspector 2 years
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How about a worn out screwdriver and a hammer? Use the side of the screwdriver and hammer it sideways. I have seen seasoned sheet metal workers cut holes in duct work as quick as an electric nibbler. Half fast but works in a pinch.
 
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