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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to thread a 3/8 stainless steel rod. I have a Snap-on tap & die set but have never tried SS. Anyone have some opinions on this?
 

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Buzzy304E
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Have you asked your Snap-On dealer if it's designed for working on S.S.?
 

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I have done it. Get some good cutting oil for stainless. Regular cutting oil will work but not as good. Just take your time with it. Also depends on what grade stainless it is. Some of it is a real B**ch.
 

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Buzzy304E
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Rigid make special dies to cut stainless for their threaders. I am gonna say the Snap-On one is not designed for S.S..

Edit.- sorry, thought the O.P. was wanting to thread tubing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is a rod that is used as a guard. It will be 30 inches long then bent both ends 3 inches long. Each end needs 1 inch threads to attach it. I need two of them, so 4 threads. I don't know if the dies are rated for SS. I'll look at the set.
 

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I need to thread a 3/8 stainless steel rod. I have a Snap-on tap & die set but have never tried SS. Anyone have some opinions on this?
How many pieces are you going to thread?
If it's just three or four, go for it, any more than that, I would get setup with the right die.
 

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Im quite familiar with this spec for sanitary and pharmaceutical jobs. No exposed threads due to niches that harbor germs. I use a Ridgid bolt threading die in the power threader and the oil for stainless (it's blue). Use new dies, and expect to replace the inserts every 50 cuts or so.
 

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Your set will be fine for the amount that you have to thread. Like CyberKnight mentioned, use some good cutting oil that specifically mentions stainless. You will know real quick if your dies are sharp or not.

ETA: You won't find machinist taps and dies rated for stainless. SS is just another metal and if you have sharp quality dies it should cut well. When hand threading I always back up a half a turn every few turns to break the chip and let oil get to the front cutting edge.
 

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Just like gas station jobs are a world of their own, food and pharma jobs have specs that are well above code and foreign to most electricians. I've done a metric ton of this type of work. I think I'll sit down here one day soon and compile typical specs for sanitary electrical work and post it to the forum. My hope would be that other guys who do obscure electrical work (oil field, airfield, etc) might compile a list of typical "above code" specs for their niche also.
 

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This is a rod that is used as a guard. It will be 30 inches long then bent both ends 3 inches long. Each end needs 1 inch threads to attach it. I need two of them, so 4 threads. I don't know if the dies are rated for SS. I'll look at the set.
If the rod is to be threaded then bent for placement, won't you need a two sided cotter pin type of application on one end?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
CADPoint said:
If the rod is to be threaded then bent for placement, won't you need a two sided cotter pin type of application on one end?
I would thread after the rod has been bent. It will be fastened with nuts on the inside of the equipment. This is a food prep location. That's why it's SS and smooth.
 

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Tool Fetish
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Stainless is very brittle and galls easily without lubricant on the fasteners. That means once you tighten the nuts, they arent removeable without cutting. Also most grades rust. I think 316, non-magnetic is the most corrosion resistant. Shunk might be able to confirm that.
 
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