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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering what you guys use to cut trough with. I have used a die grinder, and saw all. Not sure if you could get a band saw around it. I see Milwakee makes a chop saw like the plumbers use for cutting cast iron pipe with. Will have to see if it will open up big enough to cut a piece of 8x8.
 

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A portaband won't get you far.

I've always used a sawzall. A jigsaw would be better, but that's not something that was ever available to me in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow! Thank you gentleman.
You can get the metal circular saw all the way around the trough meaning four sides. Probably will rattle less if I keep the cover on it.
 

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I have found that the sawall makes kind of a jagged edge.
I never had a problem with that.

Unlike a jigsaw, your can't put the fence of the sawzall up to the metal, you need to hold the sawzall completely up in the air. Hit it with a file real quick when you're done and it should be a pretty straight edge. A did a lot of trough and miles of Walker Duct like this. The good ol' days :rolleyes:
 

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123electric said:
Just wondering what you guys use to cut trough with. I have used a die grinder, and saw all. Not sure if you could get a band saw around it. I see Milwakee makes a chop saw like the plumbers use for cutting cast iron pipe with. Will have to see if it will open up big enough to cut a piece of 8x8.
. A jigsaw with a very fine tooth metal cutting blade or a metal cutting circular saw work great for this . A sawzall will work , but not my first choice and a bandsaw would only work on 4"x4" trough .
 

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I got a regular milwaukee circ saw 6 1/2" and a metal cutting blade in it. Works as well as the small bladed purpose built metal saw, and is right hand motor, left side blade. Also, bigger blade means deeper cuts, and it comes with a decent wood blade. I don't cut strut, cable tray, or thread rod with anything else. I have cut plate with it too, 1/8 diamond plate, like butter.
Wear some sort of eye protection, and you may want a full shield.


+

Is the best way I have found.
 

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How often do you cut a trough? I think I've cut 1 maybe (since 1974).

Mostly I just order the size I need.

Oh, and that one I used a sawzall (correct teeth per inch for a good cut).
 
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How often do you cut a trough? I think I've cut 1 maybe (since 1974).

Mostly I just order the size I need.

Oh, and that one I used a sawzall (correct teeth per inch for a good cut).
I a lot of times you need a trough long enough to span across multiple panels but short enough so that it doesn't run past the panel into an obstruction. Sometimes you wrap trough around corners in electrical rooms. I've had to cut it often over the years.
 

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We've got some pretty nice wellsaws at work that could cut a pallet of trough. I realize not everyone has this luxury but if you can make friends with a fab shop or something you'll never have to worry about stuff like this again
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I a lot of times you need a trough long enough to span across multiple panels but short enough so that it doesn't run past the panel into an obstruction. Sometimes you wrap trough around corners in electrical rooms. I've had to cut it often over the years.
Trough elbow's are a joy to work with. They always look nice when everything is put back together. Many of our rooms also have trough wrapping the entire room. Both under all panels and above. Looks really clean and professional when done with gray plywood as well.
 

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A well saw is the best, but good luck having one of those on a jobsite. I did some work at one of my employers manufacturing facilities and got to use a well saw for wireway. On jobsites the best solution I found was a chop saw. Putting some scrap wood in the wire way to stiffen it really helps. We used diamond tipped blades that were a few hundred dollars apiece, but would last a good while as long as you don't put too much pressure and try to cut too fast. I would use a portaband to cut the lip so the connector goes in correctly. When I wasn't running much wireway I just used a portaband.
 

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Always used the Dewalt metal cutting circular saws. Just got the 5- 1/2" 20 volt one a couple of weeks ago. Already cut up a bunch of trough and enclosures with it. We never use nipples in between our cans or enclosures. We always flange them together. Punch a couple of 2 or 3 inch KOs a few inches apart and cut out the space in between the holes leaving a large slot. I'll take pics next time.
 
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