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Hello, I'm new to this forum. I just graduated High School and started a new job as a residential helper electrician. I went to Tech School for electrical during my Junior and Senior years.

My new boss wants me to pre-twist wires before wire-nutting. Personally, I hate doing that because when I pre-twist with linesmen pliers, the wires come out flat (especially with 3+ wires) and then putting the wire nut on is nearly impossible.

What I like to do is carefully put the wire nut on when the wires are together. I then twist until I see at least two physical twists in the wires outside of the wire nut. Then, I tug each wire to make sure it is securely connected. Is that sufficient? Or should I pre-twist?
 

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Some brands of wire nuts specifically say not to pre twist. But the short answer is no it is not required.


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You will get better as you gain experience. Then, twisting wires becomes second nature. Like you said, you're new at this. Just follow his lead and you can do it how you want when you are running the job.
 

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When I'm splicing 500 mcm with wire nuts I never pretwist. 750 and up I always do.:jester:
I have a hard time trying to twist those wire nuts. They seem as big as a truck.
 

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I am not really a fan of pre-twisting myself but sometimes I will do it like when there are more than a few wires and they don't want to cooperate, like re-working an old switch box for example. The trick is to get the twist started, then back off on the squeeze pressure with your linesmans as you twist and pull away at the same time. You will get a nice tapered splice. Then snip the end clean with a bit of an angle and the wire nut will go right on.
 

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Hello, I'm new to this forum. I just graduated High School and started a new job as a residential helper electrician. I went to Tech School for electrical during my Junior and Senior years.

My new boss wants me to pre-twist wires before wire-nutting. Personally, I hate doing that because when I pre-twist with linesmen pliers, the wires come out flat (especially with 3+ wires) and then putting the wire nut on is nearly impossible.

What I like to do is carefully put the wire nut on when the wires are together. I then twist until I see at least two physical twists in the wires outside of the wire nut. Then, I tug each wire to make sure it is securely connected. Is that sufficient? Or should I pre-twist?
The answer to your question is that your new boss wants you to do it his way. You're new, do what you're told in this case.
 

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Please show me that instruction. I have never seen an instruction that said not to pretwist...I have seen instructions that say pretwisting is not required.

I am mistaken. It is like you say- pretwisting not required, not that pretwisting isn't allowed. I learned that here actually.


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Hello, I'm new to this forum. I just graduated High School and started a new job as a residential helper electrician. I went to Tech School for electrical during my Junior and Senior years.

My new boss wants me to pre-twist wires before wire-nutting. Personally, I hate doing that because when I pre-twist with linesmen pliers, the wires come out flat (especially with 3+ wires) and then putting the wire nut on is nearly impossible.

What I like to do is carefully put the wire nut on when the wires are together. I then twist until I see at least two physical twists in the wires outside of the wire nut. Then, I tug each wire to make sure it is securely connected. Is that sufficient? Or should I pre-twist?
Hello Tim, Welcome aboard.....:thumbup:

Rule #1:

Do what the boss says.......in this case he is correct, make up your splices as if there are no wire nuts----the instructions on the box are for 'pussies' and 'homeowners' anyone that told you that using the wirenut to twist your wires together, is lazy and unprofessional, along with careless.

A professional Electrician WILL twist his wires together with his linesman's and make sure the splice is ROCK SOLID before using the wirenut. The wirenut is simply the insulator equal to the insulation on the wire.

Rule #2:

Do not be fooled by 'layabouts' who are not willing to do the work and will take every shortcut possible, not caring about the people who will burn to death because of their laziness.

Splicing:

Strip your wires long. Hold them together so they are the same length. Twist them together with your linesmen until the spiral is into the insulation nice and taut. Take your linesmen and cut the splice at an angle so the wire nut will screw on with ease--------You can practice this with some #12 solid.

Be an Electrician, not a lazy layabout who says he's an electrician.

Rule #3 Never take short cuts, that is what loser's do. You want to be a professional Electrician and that means you must do the work yourself..Do the job right or don't bother with the electrical trade.

Good luck:)
 

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None pre twisting should be a code violation. When you put a cap on none twisted wire one or more of the conductors can get pushed down, reducing the surface area contact with the others. If the difference is enough it can result in a glowing connection and ultimately fire. The spring is not for conductivity, rather a simple way of providing mechanical tension.


Proper connections are the equivalent to OCPDs. It takes just one loose connection to burn down a home and nothing will stop it other than doing it right in the first palce.
 

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Age old topic. Plenty of these threads exist already.
 
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