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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I was scrubbing some no-ox into a AL feeder today, I recalled being told a few weeks ago that it was no longer necessary.

Is this something new?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds like shirt pocket electrical code theory to me...:laughing:

It very likely may be. I heard it from J. Random Wirebender (meaning, I forget who).

I was hoping maybe that all the AL made in the last few years was some new alloy and nobody told me. :blink:
 

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Electrical Contractor
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I think the aluminum has improved and a most lugs etc. should be dual rated. I still use it anyway.
 

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Thumper
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Fellas, here is the relevant text from that Southwire PDF Cow linked.

Terminating aluminum conductors
  1. Always use a connector that is listed for use with aluminum wire.
  2. The following is recommended but not required. Always follow the connector manufacturer's instructions.
    • The surface of the conductor should be wire-brushed to break any aluminum oxide barrier leaving a clean surface for the connection.
    • The use of anti-oxidant compound, joint compound, is not required unless the connectors manufacturer requires it. However, the use of a listed joint compound is always a good practice.
  3. Always tighten set-screw type connectors to the manufacturer's recommended torque.
  4. Most importantly, do not re-torque the terminations as part of routine maintenance. As with copper conductors, repeated tightening of any set-screw connections can result in the eventual “biting” through the conductor causing the termination to fail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·


I have skimmed that document many times but never noticed the page on terminating their AL.

Quoting from pg 24:

"The use of anti-oxidant compound, joint compound, is not required unless the connector’s manufacturer requires it. However, the use of a listed joint compound is always a good practice."


Edited to add: We all seem to have found page 24. :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I will just keep doing what I have have been doing - scrubbing it in with a wire brush.

It has been a long and painful day. I am so far behind on jobs that I really need to work tomorrow also to try to catch up a bit. A bunch of outdoors stuff and the high temp is supposed to be 29.

So, I am going to go to bed and consider my poor life choices while I drift off to sleep. Good night y'all. :thumbsup:
 

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Also they like to see galv paint on threads we make on rigid.
Do you use something to get the cutting oil off the threads (like maybe acetone)? I would think just wiping the oil off would leave enough of the film that the galv paint won't stick in the long run. It takes a lot of diligence to do that paint thing correct.
 

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Can't Remember
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I had this conversation with a sales guy at a show. He says I bet you are still using that stuff. I said show me where it says in any of your literature not to. He spoke with one of his engineers and they pulled out a similar document saying the same thing as above. Unless it says not to, I'm still using the secret sauce.
 

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I wonder how much of that secret sauce i've ingested....? ~CS~
Probably somewhere along the lines of asbestos you've ingested working construction in older buildings and homes.

Pete
 
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