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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2880 watts @ 240 volts equals 12 amps. Does a 14 gauge NM on a 2 pole 15 breaker suffice or does the circuit need to increased by a factor of 1.25?
 

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Scotchkote Installer
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424.3 Branch Circuits.
(A) Branch-Circuit Requirements. Individual branch circuits
shall be permitted to supply any volt-ampere or wattage
rating of fixed electric space-heating equipment for
which they are rated.
Branch circuits supplying two or more outlets for fixed
electric space-heating equipment shall be rated 15, 20, 25,
or 30 amperes. In other than a dwelling unit, fixed infrared
heating equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from
branch circuits rated not over 50 amperes.
(B) Branch-Circuit Sizing. Fixed electric space-heating
equipment and motors shall be considered continuous load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
424.3 Branch Circuits.
(A) Branch-Circuit Requirements. Individual branch circuits
shall be permitted to supply any volt-ampere or wattage
rating of fixed electric space-heating equipment for
which they are rated.
Branch circuits supplying two or more outlets for fixed
electric space-heating equipment shall be rated 15, 20, 25,
or 30 amperes. In other than a dwelling unit, fixed infrared
heating equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from
branch circuits rated not over 50 amperes.
(B) Branch-Circuit Sizing. Fixed electric space-heating
equipment and motors shall be considered continuous load.
Understood. So 12 * 1.25 = 15 amps making the circuit compliant. Correct?
 

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Scotchkote Installer
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I would still run #12.. running #14 for any kind of large load is a waste of time .. IMO..

Save the #14 for lighting circuits... having #12 gives you more bang for the buck and "wiggle room" if the load changes...

The cost is pennies...but the payback can be $$$$$...
 

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I would still run #12.. running #14 for any kind of large load is a waste of time .. IMO..

Save the #14 for lighting circuits... having #12 gives you more bang for the buck and "wiggle room" if the load changes...

The cost is pennies...but the payback can be $$$$$...
I would end up running 12 because I don't stock 14 but that said, the load of a hardwired baseboard heater is not going to change.
 

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Scotchkote Installer
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I would end up running 12 because I don't stock 14 but that said, the load of a hardwired baseboard heater is not going to change.
I have been on jobs where the square foot of the room has been altered..

There have been other times when a small heater needed to be installed in a bathroom...

Having the larger circuit already in place makes the reno much easier...
 

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I have been on jobs where the square foot of the room has been altered..

There have been other times when a small heater needed to be installed in a bathroom...

Having the larger circuit already in place makes the reno much easier...
It's nice having a larger circuit available. That being said, you can never predict when if ever a place will be remodeled.
 

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I have been on jobs where the square foot of the room has been altered..

There have been other times when a small heater needed to be installed in a bathroom...

Having the larger circuit already in place makes the reno much easier...
Maybe, or not.

At 12 amps you can't add much to even a 20 amp circuit.

If the room size changes and the heater needs to be larger that sounds like an extra not a problem.
 

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It's nice having a larger circuit available. That being said, you can never predict when if ever a place will be remodeled.
Very true.. but I charge for the larger circuit to begin with....

Almost all of my jobs are repeat customers so I already know where to find power...

People don't want to hear you have to open up walls or run conduit to make their wish happen....
 

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Why would a electric baseboard heater controlled by a thermostat be considered a "continuous load".. :blink::blink:

It would never take that long to reach room temperature unless you started out at 40 degrees...

Continuous Load. A load where the maximum current is
expected to continue for 3 hours or more.
 

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Why would a electric baseboard heater controlled by a thermostat be considered a "continuous load".. :blink::blink:

It would never take that long to reach room temperature unless you started out at 40 degrees...

Continuous Load. A load where the maximum current is
expected to continue for 3 hours or more.
My guess is that it is because people often undersize electric heaters and they do often end up running continuously.

Heaters in entry vestibules are a common example.
 
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