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meadow said:
New condo/apartment under construction... What is the code required VA per foot involving electric baseboard heat? Units are 1,400 sq feet livable space.
Heat loss is the first question. Other than that, I set as large a baseboard that will fit. 150 foot bedroom gets a 6 footer. Dinning room and living room get a little oversized because the kitchen won't have any(usually). So in Minnesota, I'm at 14 to 20 watts per sq ft, but we're cold too.
 

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It all depends on where you live and how well insulated the place is. Since your profile has the United States so it is hard to guess but a safe bet may be 7 watts/sq.ft sinceit is new construction.

Further north maybe 10 watts/sq.ft
 
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Heat loss is the first question. Other than that, I set as large a baseboard that will fit. 150 foot bedroom gets a 6 footer. Dinning room and living room get a little oversized because the kitchen won't have any(usually). So in Minnesota, I'm at 14 to 20 watts per sq ft, but we're cold too.
Up here in the great white north where it does get cold we typically go 10 watts per squre foot in an old house. This climate range is like Seattle. Well insulated houses are 7 watts / sq foot. Where do you use 20?

I know of a house in Edmonton where it can get to 40 below that only need 1000 watts to heat the whole house. or less than 1/2 watt per square foot. Walls are a foot thick and cielings get R100 or about 2 feet of insulation.

The specific house can go 24 hours without heat at 30 below and only cool 2 degrees. This is not typical of houses in Edmonton but does show how little heat a super insulated house needs to stay warm. Note that it can take more than a few days to recovers from large heat losses like an open front door.
 

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Mshea said:
Up here in the great white north where it does get cold we typically go 10 watts per squre foot in an old house. This climate range is like Seattle. Well insulated houses are 7 watts / sq foot. Where do you use 20? I know of a house in Edmonton where it can get to 40 below that only need 1000 watts to heat the whole house. or less than 1/2 watt per square foot. Walls are a foot thick and cielings get R100 or about 2 feet of insulation. The specific house can go 24 hours without heat at 30 below and only cool 2 degrees. This is not typical of houses in Edmonton but does show how little heat a super insulated house needs to stay warm. Note that it can take more than a few days to recovers from large heat losses like an open front door.
In areas that must heat more than their sq feet, like dinning and living rooms attached to kitchens. I thought I explain that. If I had a 10x10 bed room, I would install a 6 foot baseboard. That's 15 watts per sq ft. I wouldn't go with just a 4 footer. If it was 12x12, still a 6 footer. Any bigger, I would jump to an 8. You can't put too much in.
 

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Estwing magic
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The mechanical engineer is typically responsible for the heat loss calculation, regardless of whether it's gas or electric heat.

For new construction here, ten watts per square foot is overkill but we might have more stringent insulation and infiltration requirements per building code than you guys down there.
 

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99cents said:
The mechanical engineer is typically responsible for the heat loss calculation, regardless of whether it's gas or electric heat. For new construction here, ten watts per square foot is overkill but we might have more stringent insulation and infiltration requirements per building code than you guys down there.
Depends on where you are building. Most of northern Minnesota has no enforced building code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the input :thumbup: Id be lost without this place/ :thumbsup:



So far Im leaning toward 10 watts per square foot. If I did oversize the heat, would I have to increase my load calcs for the service? My theory is that if its oversized those heaters wnt run all at the same time.
 

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meadow said:
Thanks for the input :thumbup: Id be lost without this place/ :thumbsup: So far Im leaning toward 10 watts per square foot. If I did oversize the heat, would I have to increase my load calcs for the service? My theory is that if its oversized those heaters wnt run all at the same time.
It's connected load and must be counted as continuos.
 

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Most Heat guys do a good calc , which we can trans btu for watts

And i'm all about oversizing, and having the providing circuitry run cooler continuosly, if only what i've seen of older units worked to an early demise


~CS~
 

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If it's an apartment or condo units, it becomes a little complicated. Cold air infiltration is higher in end units and upper floor units. A unit in the middle of the building requires hardly any heat at all since it might only be losing heat to one exterior wall. With any unit, you're not losing heat through walls that are shared with a heated common area like a hallway.

With a house that is reasonably well insulated you can use ten watts per square foot as a rule of thumb but it has walls, ceiling and floor that are all subject to cold air infiltration. That isn't the case with apartments and condos if you look at individual suites.

If somebody hasn't done a detailed per suite watts loss calc then something's wrong.
 

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In my corner of the electrical universe, elec heat is evil, one poco even had a bounty on 'em....:eek::thumbup:

~CS~
With electricity up around $0.175/kW hr it is just about cheaper to burn dollar bills to heat your house versus electric heat. Wood is good.
 
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